Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Texas" ...

  • Texas Tribune: Families Divided

    Thanks to unrelenting investigative reporting from a scrappy but devoted team of Texas Tribune journalists, the stories of migrant children separated from their parents at the border have fully come to light — and revealed the profound human toll of a sudden policy shift from Washington that reverberated around the world.
  • Texas Tribune: Dangerous Deliveries

    The Texas Tribune's Dangerous Deliveries project revealed how state lawmakers squandered opportunities to help more women access life-saving services, and how that fed the state's crisis-level maternal mortality rate for black women. And it underscored the critical nature of the problem by telling the stories of women like Sable Swallow, an uninsured waitress who was released from the hospital after giving birth even though she told nurses she had a terrible headache. After she left the hospital, the 25-year-old had a stroke.
  • Texas Tribune: Blocked Out

    The Texas Tribune revealed how powerful people, from state lawmakers and city officials to politically active neighborhood leaders, have made housing of all kinds harder to find, especially subsidized housing for the state’s poorest residents. And it exposed how those powerful people are enabled by discriminatory state laws and local ordinances that grew from pre-civil rights segregation policies. The result is worsening economic inequality and racial segregation in a growing state that isn't making room fast enough for its exploding population.
  • Texas Observer: Access Denied

    The Texas Public Information Act is under attack. The law, which ensures the public’s access to government records, has taken a beating from state Supreme Court jurists, lawmakers and state agencies since it was passed in 1973. Once a shining example of government transparency, the law has been eroded by a growing list of loopholes for everything from ongoing police investigations and the dates of birth of government employees to information related to executions. Journalists are well aware of this problem, but it had never been presented to the public in a deep-dive feature until now. “Access Denied” reveals that government officials can delay, derail and deny requests by slow-walking them or charging exorbitant fees. This piece was reported over six months and included interviews with dozens of government officials, investigative journalists, citizen activists and researchers.
  • Houston Chronicle: Prison denies inmates dentures

    One main story and two follow-ups on denture policy in Texas prisons.
  • Our Most Vulnerable: A WFAA Investigation

    “Our Most Vulnerable: A WFAA Investigation” is a year-long investigation revealing how the pursuit of profits and a lack of effective regulation and oversight has created nightmarish conditions inside facilities that care for our most vulnerable in society: the elderly and those seeking mental health help.
  • KXAN: DENIED

    Texas law gives police discretion to withhold information when suspects die in custody. Legislative efforts to close that loophole have failed, but it has not stopped the families who have been denied video and other records detailing their loved ones' final moments from speaking out. A KXAN investigation sheds light on this statewide need for police accountability, transparency and trust.
  • Kids on the Line: An investigation into the contractors behind family separation

    As the U.S. government’s family separation policy played out in real time, Reveal’s investigation uncovered major problems with the contractors tasked with caring for immigrant children, including a defense company holding immigrant children in unlicensed facilities -- vacant office buildings in Phoenix without yards, showers or kitchens -- and a Texas shelter drugging immigrant children without their consent.
  • Houston Chronicle: Silent Spills

    A joint investigation by the two news organizations (Houston Chronicle and AP)found that industrial spills unleashed by Hurricane Harvey in Houston were far worse than publicly reported. Impacted citizens were kept in the dark about their size and seriousness. State and federal officials misled the public with repeated assurances that no health hazards existed. Six months after Harvey, Texas regulators had not announced a single enforcement action from 89 incidents investigated. Reporters from the Chronicle and AP filed dozens of records requests, unearthing long-hidden government-funded research and cross-referencing spill data collected from a hodgepodge of state and local agencies to determine the true scope of the damage. The vital watchdog role they performed highlighted a lack of will by Texas state regulators to effectively police the petrochemical industry. But its industry-friendly approach had weakened local efforts to build cases against the worst polluters, many of them repeat environmental offenders.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Unwatched

    Stories about children hurt or killed while in childcare pop up often enough that the Austin American-Statesman’s investigative team started to wonder: How safe are Texas child cares? The Statesman's investigative team dug into thousands of pages of state records, made more than 100 public information requests, and spoke with dozens of families, experts and state officials. We analyzed 40,000 day care violations and built a database showing that child care providers are often not paying attention when children get hurt and that hundreds of operations have been cited for failing to tell both parents and the state when children are hurt. We sought to give readers a comprehensive look at safety issues in the Texas day care system — a system that serves more than 1 million children every day.