Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "USA TODAY NETWORK" ...

  • The Marshall Project and USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee: Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary

    “Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary” revealed for the first time the devastating toll of Tennessee’s “safekeeper” law that puts people in solitary confinement who are mentally ill, pregnant or juveniles despite not being convicted of any crime — and sparked prompt changes to the state’s 150-year-old law.
  • Kaiser Health News and USA TODAY Network: Surgery Center deaths

    Millions of Americans are having routine surgeries performed at the nation’s 5,600-plus surgery centers, the small facilities that promise to get you in and out quickly, and at a much lower cost. But some of those facilities lack the staff or training to handle emergencies, and have been taking on increasingly fragile patients. It’s a dangerous situation that has put patients’ lives at risk and even children’s lives at risk, a groundbreaking investigation by Kaiser Health News and USA Today Network discovered. Hundreds of patients, some as young as two, have died after having surgeries as simple as tonsillectomies or colonoscopies. And at least 7,000 patients a year had to be raced by ambulance to a local hospital when something went wrong.
  • Untested Rape Kits

    In the most detailed nationwide inventory of untested rape kits ever, the USA TODAY NETWORK identified at least 70,000 neglected kits in an open-records campaign covering 1,000-plus police agencies, shedding important new light on the adequacy of police investigations of allegations of sexual assault. http://www.usatoday.com/topic/34f462d0-c9d0-4ee3-86d3-95287b5a286f/untested-rape-kits/ http://www.usatoday.com/pages/interactives/untested-rape-kits/
  • Biolabs In Your Backyard: Inside America's secretive biolabs

    A USA TODAY NETWORK investigation revealed hundreds of safety accidents have occurred at secretive biolabs that have proliferated under U.S. counterterrorism policies, yet fragmented regulation lets troubled facilities keep experimenting with dangerous pathogens. Labs and regulators – often citing federal bioterrorism laws -- fought reporters seeking access to even basic information about lab accidents as well as government inspections and enforcement actions. The series has resulted in congressional investigations, an internal CDC review that prompted the replacement of a top lab regulator, and a White House recommendation for greater transparency and public accountability about lab operations and accidents.
  • Police Cell Phone Surveillance

    The National Security Agency isn't the only government entity secretly collecting data from people's cellphones. The joint USA TODAY Network investigation found that local police are increasingly scooping it up, too. Armed with new technologies, including mobile devices that tap into cellphone data in real time, dozens of local and state police agencies are capturing information about thousands of cellphone users at a time, whether they are targets of an investigation or not, according to public records obtained by USA TODAY and Gannett newspapers and TV stations across the U.S. The records, from more than 125 police agencies in 33 states, reveal about one in four law-enforcement agencies have used a tactic known as a "tower dump," which gives police data about the identity, activity and location of any phone that connects to the targeted cellphone towers over a set span of time, usually an hour or two. A typical dump covers multiple towers, and wireless providers, and can net information from thousands of phones. We also found that at least 25 police departments own a Stingray, a suitcase-size device that costs as much as $400,000 and acts as a fake cell tower. The system, typically installed in a vehicle so it can be moved into any neighborhood, tricks all nearby phones into connecting to it and feeding data to police. In some states, the devices are available to any local police department via state surveillance units. The federal government funds most of the purchases, via anti-terror grants. Police mostly didn’t want to talk about the tactics, though privacy advocates and state and federal lawmakers expressed serious concerns about the ability of local police to scoop up large amounts of data on people who weren’t under investigation and typically without the same protections, and checks and balances, afforded by a search warrant.