Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Wall Street Journal" ...

  • Forsaken by the Indian Health Service

    PBS’s Frontline and The Wall Street Journal investigated sexual predators, terrible doctors, and inept leaders within the U.S. Indian Health Service.
  • WSJ: The Forces Behind America's Political Divide

    Why are Americans so divided? The Wall Street Journal set out to answer this question in a set of visually-driven stories that made novel use of economic and demographic data, as well as through an analysis of the original response files from the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll that unearthed new insights. Our exploration found that America's political divisions are being driven by economic and social forces that are fairly new in politics.
  • WSJ: Big Tech's Hidden Costs

    Congress and federal regulators do very little to police Amazon, Facebook and other big technology platforms that dominate the global economy and modern life. The companies say it's not their responsibility to protect consumers from online hazards, due to carve-outs in federal law for digital platforms. The Wall Street Journal investigated the many ways tech companies are passing on that responsibility—and the potential risks—to unwitting consumers. The Journal's reporting stopped Facebook from collecting sensitive personal data including users' menstrual cycles and heart rates; alerted parents to the lack of vetting for prospective nannies with police records including child abuse, sexual assault and murder; and forced Amazon to remove thousands of federally banned and unsafe products including toys with dangerous levels of lead.
  • WSJ: When Wall Street Flips Municipal Bonds, Towns and Schools Pay the Price

    A yearlong investigation uncovered how Wall Street firms profit and local governments often lose out when they sell bonds in the municipal market. The Wall Street Journal combined sources to create an unprecedented database of municipal bond trades to show how the securities firms governments pay to sell their debt routinely underprice those bonds, unload them with very little risk, then often buy them back at higher prices. Those not bought back also run up in price as other securities firms snap them up and resell them.
  • WSJ: Trump’s Hush Money

    A Wall Street Journal investigation uncovered secret payoffs and a botched cover-up that placed Donald Trump in the middle of a criminal scheme to silence a porn star and a Playboy model who allegedly had sex with him.
  • WSJ: The Fall of Steve Wynn

    Steve Wynn, the powerful casino executive considered the creator of modern Las Vegas, was responsible for a decadeslong pattern of sexual misconduct and harassment toward employees.
  • WSJ: Cryptocurrency Decrypted

    Bitcoin surged in 2018, attracting billions of investor dollars before prices plummeted. The Journal used innovative data reporting and traditional human sourcing to investigate the crush of frauds, money launderers and unjustified optimism that developed in the boom and came undone in the bust.
  • Accounting for Terror

    As terrorism shook the Western world in 2016, The Wall Street Journal investigated an area largely unexamined in the public furor over repeated attacks: the money trail. In a yearlong series, “Accounting for Terror,” a team of Journal reporters followed the money—in one case, literally. The stories illuminated an invisible foundation of ISIS and other terrorist groups: the economic engines that support their reign of murder and violence. The Journal obtained secret ISIS documents describing the terror group’s construction of a multinational oil operation obsessed with maximizing profits. It showed how some suspects in the Paris and Brussels terrorist attacks collected welfare benefits until just before they acted. And it detailed how an iconic American food producer of Butterball turkeys has done millions of dollars of business in Africa with a company blacklisted by U.S. authorities for supporting terrorism.
  • Why Some Problem Cops Don’t Lose Their Badges

    A Wall Street Journal examination shows how states allow some police officers to remain on the force despite misconduct.
  • Blue Feed, Red Feed

    Facebook’s role in providing Americans with political news has never been stronger—or more controversial. Scholars worry that the social network can create “echo chambers,” where users see posts only from like-minded friends and media sources. Facebook encourages users to “keep an open mind” by seeking out posts that don’t appear in their feeds. To demonstrate how reality may differ for different Facebook users, The Wall Street Journal created two feeds, one “blue” and the other “red.” If a source appears in the red feed, a majority of the articles shared from the source were classified as “very conservatively aligned” in a large 2015 Facebook study. For the blue feed, a majority of each source’s articles aligned “very liberal.” These aren't intended to resemble actual individual news feeds. Instead, they are rare side-by-side looks at real conversations from different perspectives.