Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "White House" ...

  • Almost Forbidden

    As vaping-related youth nicotine addiction surged across the United States, we exposed a key political decision to ignore the clear warning signs years before the crisis. Government documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times revealed that, four years ago, the Food and Drug administration attempted to ban vaping flavors that were hooking young teenagers to nicotine. But after a deluge of over 100 lobbyists visited the White House, senior political officials overruled experts at the FDA and eliminated the flavor ban, along with much of the scientific evidence calling for it. Later that year, the national youth vaping rate skyrocketed.
  • #UkraineDocs

    Our principal three stories — written by Smith and published on Dec. 13, Dec. 20, and Jan. 2 — revealed first that the Trump administration was hiding critical information about the potential legality of the President’s holdup of Ukraine aid, second that officials at the Pentagon were worried that the holdup violated a spending law, and third that the holdup ignited increasingly strident protests by Pentagon officials who said it was illegal and that it should have been disclosed to Congress.
  • NYT: Using FOIA To Open Access to the Government in the Trump Era

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times. FOIA, for almost every piece we have published, has been a critical part of our reporting.
  • NYT: Trump's Assault on the Environment

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times.
  • Newsweek: 2018 U.S. Military Southern Border Deployment

    An investigation into President Donald Trump's decision to deploy thousands of military troops to the southern border as a caravan of migrants travel to the U.S. in search of asylum.
  • Asylum Crackdown

    In her investigation “Chinatown Asylum Crackdown,” NPR’s Ailsa Chang shines a light on a never-before reported aspect of the Trump administration’s clampdown on the asylum system. Much of the news coverage on President Trump’s immigration policies has been focused on the White House’s efforts to turn away asylum-seekers at the border. What Chang reveals in her investigation for NPR’s Planet Money podcast is the Trump administration’s quiet operation to strip asylum status from immigrants who won it years ago. The people targeted in this sweeping review are Chinese immigrants – more than 13,000 of them. Many of them have been living in the U.S. for years with green cards and are now spending thousands of dollars defending their asylum cases in immigration court – years after winning asylum.
  • Washington Post: Appointees

    The Post vetted Trump’s appointees, from the most visible to the virtually unknown, in ways the White House had not. Some of the results were disqualifying.
  • The Jindal Effect

    WVUE’s investigation, “The Jindal Effect,” exposed the crippling financial impact Gov. Bobby Jindal’s failed presidential bid had on the state of Louisiana. This entry focuses on two major areas: Jindal's presidential run and the impact on Louisiana. The first (Jindal's Presidential run) shows how the governor may have broken state law, forced Louisiana taxpayers to fund part of his presidential campaign, and questionably raises millions of dollars for his campaign. The series also looks at the effect on taxpayers. Jindal cut budgets but showered big business with gifts as he tried to pave a road to the White House. The result of this series was an exposé on the ways Bobby Jindal ultimately let Louisiana suffer at the expense of his presidential aspirations. https://youtu.be/0N3HrW5cWf8
  • CIA Torture, a Senate Investigation, and the Google Search That Launched a Spying Scandal

    In December 2014, the US Senate released the executive summary of its long-awaited 6,700-page report on the CIA’s torture program. The heavily redacted document answered some questions—but it raised far more. In January 2015, VICE News set out to reveal more about both the CIA’s program and the Senate’s investigation of it. But we faced a daunting task: covering the story in the face of intense secrecy at the CIA, the Department of Justice, the White House, and Congress. We needed to figure out how to report a story when no sources were willing to go on the record—or, in many cases, to speak to us at all. VICE News found a way, producing a series of 10 groundbreaking and exclusive investigative reports that succeeded in closing the books on many of those unanswered questions surrounding the CIA’s torture program and the Senate’s investigation into it, laying bare previously unknown details about one of the darkest chapters in US history
  • Biolabs In Your Backyard: Inside America's secretive biolabs

    A USA TODAY NETWORK investigation revealed hundreds of safety accidents have occurred at secretive biolabs that have proliferated under U.S. counterterrorism policies, yet fragmented regulation lets troubled facilities keep experimenting with dangerous pathogens. Labs and regulators – often citing federal bioterrorism laws -- fought reporters seeking access to even basic information about lab accidents as well as government inspections and enforcement actions. The series has resulted in congressional investigations, an internal CDC review that prompted the replacement of a top lab regulator, and a White House recommendation for greater transparency and public accountability about lab operations and accidents.