Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "White House" ...

  • Asylum Crackdown

    In her investigation “Chinatown Asylum Crackdown,” NPR’s Ailsa Chang shines a light on a never-before reported aspect of the Trump administration’s clampdown on the asylum system. Much of the news coverage on President Trump’s immigration policies has been focused on the White House’s efforts to turn away asylum-seekers at the border. What Chang reveals in her investigation for NPR’s Planet Money podcast is the Trump administration’s quiet operation to strip asylum status from immigrants who won it years ago. The people targeted in this sweeping review are Chinese immigrants – more than 13,000 of them. Many of them have been living in the U.S. for years with green cards and are now spending thousands of dollars defending their asylum cases in immigration court – years after winning asylum.
  • Washington Post: Appointees

    The Post vetted Trump’s appointees, from the most visible to the virtually unknown, in ways the White House had not. Some of the results were disqualifying.
  • The Jindal Effect

    WVUE’s investigation, “The Jindal Effect,” exposed the crippling financial impact Gov. Bobby Jindal’s failed presidential bid had on the state of Louisiana. This entry focuses on two major areas: Jindal's presidential run and the impact on Louisiana. The first (Jindal's Presidential run) shows how the governor may have broken state law, forced Louisiana taxpayers to fund part of his presidential campaign, and questionably raises millions of dollars for his campaign. The series also looks at the effect on taxpayers. Jindal cut budgets but showered big business with gifts as he tried to pave a road to the White House. The result of this series was an exposé on the ways Bobby Jindal ultimately let Louisiana suffer at the expense of his presidential aspirations. https://youtu.be/0N3HrW5cWf8
  • CIA Torture, a Senate Investigation, and the Google Search That Launched a Spying Scandal

    In December 2014, the US Senate released the executive summary of its long-awaited 6,700-page report on the CIA’s torture program. The heavily redacted document answered some questions—but it raised far more. In January 2015, VICE News set out to reveal more about both the CIA’s program and the Senate’s investigation of it. But we faced a daunting task: covering the story in the face of intense secrecy at the CIA, the Department of Justice, the White House, and Congress. We needed to figure out how to report a story when no sources were willing to go on the record—or, in many cases, to speak to us at all. VICE News found a way, producing a series of 10 groundbreaking and exclusive investigative reports that succeeded in closing the books on many of those unanswered questions surrounding the CIA’s torture program and the Senate’s investigation into it, laying bare previously unknown details about one of the darkest chapters in US history
  • Biolabs In Your Backyard: Inside America's secretive biolabs

    A USA TODAY NETWORK investigation revealed hundreds of safety accidents have occurred at secretive biolabs that have proliferated under U.S. counterterrorism policies, yet fragmented regulation lets troubled facilities keep experimenting with dangerous pathogens. Labs and regulators – often citing federal bioterrorism laws -- fought reporters seeking access to even basic information about lab accidents as well as government inspections and enforcement actions. The series has resulted in congressional investigations, an internal CDC review that prompted the replacement of a top lab regulator, and a White House recommendation for greater transparency and public accountability about lab operations and accidents.
  • Why Did The Washington Post Name The White House Volunteer Accused In Prostitution Scandal?

    The Washington Post broke several details about the United States Secret Service this year and received high praise. But The Washington Post's explosive Oct. 8 allegations about a former White House volunteer soliciting a prostitute during a 2012 trip to Cartagena, and unsubstantiated claims of a White House cover-up, deserved scrutiny. The Huffington Post looked deeply at the alleged "evidence" and published private correspondence between editors and attorneys to show that much of what was promoted as new information on Oct. 8 had been rebutted more than seven months earlier. It was later revealed that a key source for the The Post had prostitution allegations against himself, raising more questions about the paper's decision to publish such potentially damaging claims.
  • Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power

    Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power is a series of reports on the exercise of power by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and his administration. The stories investigate his administration’s use of the busiest bridge in the world to take political revenge on a small-town mayor; the operation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for the political and financial benefit of his administration and his friends and donors; and the use of federal Sandy aid to strong arm the mayor of Hoboken. These reports focused national attention on a leading Republican candidate in the 2016 presidential race. Plus, they established the narrative both for national and local coverage and for state and federal investigations of the administration. Most important, WNYC uncovered key information about the politicization of public entities by an elected official whose appeal to voters is based on the perception that he is above politics. Our submission for review by the IRE includes our most significant work on this story. Our reporting resulted in the forced resignation of Gov. Christie’s top man at the Port Authority, a bi-state agency that controls $8 billion in annual revenue raised largely from tolls and fares paid by commuters of this region. In addition, WNYC’s in-depth reports on the Port Authority prompted criminal investigations by the Manhattan District Attorney and the Securities and Exchange Commission into the misuse of Port Authority funds. It led the United States Attorney for New Jersey to widen its investigation into conflicts of interest by David Samson, the Port Authority Chair, and a close Christie ally. And the reporting has spurred the creation of a bi-state panel to reform the Port Authority, as well as reform measures in the New Jersey and New York Legislatures.
  • Data show that poorer families are bearing the brunt of college price hikes

    In an 11-month project, The Hechinger Report empirically tested the oft-repeated claim of universities and colleges that they are helping low-income students afford the cost of higher education. The Report analyzed federal data to determine the net price -- what students are actually charged, after discounts and financial aid are taken into account -- at thousands of colleges and universities. The Report found many schools increased the net price much faster for their lowest-income students than for wealthier ones. Sidebars also showed that federal financial aid, including tax credits and the work-study program, disproportionately benefit the rich. And in a followup, using a successive year of data later made available during 2014, The Hechinger Report reported that 100 colleges and universities that promised at a White House summit to make higher education more affordable for the lowest-income students had actually raised their prices faster for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. The project included a unique, first-of-its-kind, easy-to-use, searchable website called Tuition Tracker (tuitiontracker.org) through which readers could find any college and university and see how its net price has changed, by any of five income groupings.
  • Spies versus Congress: A Constitutional Crisis over Torture

    McClatchy’s reporting first exposed and then detailed multiple efforts by the CIA and White House to thwart the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation into the agency’s use of torture, including CIA intrusions into the committee’s computers, in the most serious clash over congressional oversight of intelligence operations in decades. Other McClatchy reporting revealed the startling, top-secret conclusions of the committee's five-year, $40 million investigation eight months before the public release of the report's declassified executive summary.
  • Immigration

    After the Homeland Security Department announced that several hundred immigrants had been released from immigration jails due to budget cuts, Associated Press reporter Alicia A. Caldwell exclusively revealed that the U.S. government actually had released more than 2,000 of them. The White House and Homeland Security Secretary disputed AP’s reporting for weeks before the Obama administration, under oath, conceded that AP had been correct all along.