Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Yemen" ...

  • Brian Ross Investigates: Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.
  • Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.
  • Inside the Terror Plot

    In April, just prior to the anniversary of the death of Osama bin Laden, the ABC News Brian Ross investigative team learned of a fast developing terror threat in a new plot by the notorious Yemeni master bomb maker al-Asiri. Balancing the journalistic requirements of reporting the news against advisories by the White House that agents were at risk, ABC News led the way on the air in tracking and revealing the developments. The ABC’s team reporting ultimately revealed exclusive details of how the CIA and British intelligence worked together in a daring operation involving a double agent who infiltrated al-Asiri’s network and carried the bomb safely out of Yemen into the hands of western intelligence.
  • The Fort Hood Shootings

    The investigation showcases the unraveling of the Fort Hood massacre. It chronicles the repeated failure of U.S. intelligence to take substantive action against the assailant, Nidal Hasan, and the bureaucratic decisions that ultimately snowballed into a tragedy.
  • The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America

    This book is Bamford's latest expose' of the National Security Agency. Among his findings, Bamford reveals that the agency had been targeting the Yemeni home that served as Osama bin Laden's operations center prior to 9/11 but had never told the FBI that the al-Qaida terrorists were there. Bamford's book demonstrates an unparalleled ability to penetrate the most secretive of institutions.
  • Frontline: Chasing the Sleeper Cell

    New York Times Television looks at the efforts of the FBI to prevent acts of terrorism before they happen. In their efforts, the government has often prosecuted groups of people. This story looks at a particular group who underwent training in Afghanistan. Though there was no imminent danger from this group, they were arrested and the courts found them guilty.
  • Unclear Danger: Inside the Lackawanna terror case

    In the spring of 2001, seven young Yemeni-American from Lackawanna, New York went to Afghanistan to train for Jihad. What followed is one of the most intense and high profile terrorism cases since Sept. 11. The story offers the perfect backdrop for a story about how terrorist cases are pursued in the wake of the Patriot Act.
  • Us deportations to Muslim nations soar

    In the year after Sept. 11, the US government increased the deportation of people from Muslim nations, as it eased up on illegal immigrants from Mexico and other countries. The largest percentage increases in deportations last year were for citizens in Tunisia, Morocco, Egypt, Yemen, Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, Algeria and Saudi Arabia. Deportations to Mexico fell 24 percent.
  • Attack on the U.S.S. Cole

    ABC News reports on "the minutes, hours and days after the after a terrorist bomb killed 17 sailors" aboard the U.S.S. Cole in the harbor of Aden, Yemen, on Oct. 12, 2000. The segment includes parts of a videotape made by a Cole sailor a few hours after the attack. The investigation reveals that the terrorists involved in the attack were linked to the network of Osama bin Laden, and that they have unsuccessfully attempted to attack other Navy ships before. The program tells the story of the 294 sailors, most of whom confronted and overcame the deadly peril with unusual poise and valor.
  • Odd Numbers

    The Wall Street Journal looks at the difficulties in calculating monthly unemployment rates and what the numbers actually refelect. The example used is a month when Ohio figures showed that unemployment was 3.9% when that figure couldn't have been right.