Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "agencies" ...

  • NBCLA: Pepper Spray Use Skyrockets at Juvenile Hall

    The use of pepper spray by probation officers at Los Angeles County juvenile halls and camps has skyrocketed over the last few years, prompting an investigation and raising concerns as similar agencies across the country are banning pepper spray use, citing health concerns.
  • KPCC: Repeat

    KPCC’s “Repeat” is a serialized podcast that shows how one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the country, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, investigates officers who shoot civilians. We found a system that is largely shielded from public scrutiny and raised questions about the secrecy of internal investigations.
  • KARE 11 Investigates: “Double Billing the Badge – The Patrol Car Payback”

    “Double Billing the Badge – The Patrol Car Payback” exposed a complex scheme to overcharge hundreds of police agencies on thousands of squad cars. It has prompted a criminal conviction, reforms in state procurement policies, and a massive refund of taxpayer dollars.
  • KARE 11 Investigates: “A Pattern of Denial”

    KARE 11’s two-year investigation exposed a systemic nationwide pattern of veterans having their emergency medical bills improperly denied and often turned over to collection agencies. VA whistleblowers revealed to KARE that government quotas for processing claims – and a computer system that made it easier to deny claims than to approve them – were to blame for many denials. The improper denials could total billions of dollars.
  • Houston Chronicle: Silent Spills

    A joint investigation by the two news organizations (Houston Chronicle and AP)found that industrial spills unleashed by Hurricane Harvey in Houston were far worse than publicly reported. Impacted citizens were kept in the dark about their size and seriousness. State and federal officials misled the public with repeated assurances that no health hazards existed. Six months after Harvey, Texas regulators had not announced a single enforcement action from 89 incidents investigated. Reporters from the Chronicle and AP filed dozens of records requests, unearthing long-hidden government-funded research and cross-referencing spill data collected from a hodgepodge of state and local agencies to determine the true scope of the damage. The vital watchdog role they performed highlighted a lack of will by Texas state regulators to effectively police the petrochemical industry. But its industry-friendly approach had weakened local efforts to build cases against the worst polluters, many of them repeat environmental offenders.
  • Drivers Under Siege

    They are not police officers or firefighters, yet Bay Area bus drivers who work for the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) face some of the most dangerous working conditions with the fewest protections. Using public records and video footage, our analysis found that bus drivers with AC Transit faced more violent assaults than any other district in the San Francisco Bay Area. After we started asking questions, AC Transit announced it would test out new bus shields to protect drivers and California lawmakers introduced a federal bill in Congress with bipartisan support that will require transit districts across the country to reassess their safety measures. The new law would allocate $25 million a year for five years to pay for shields, de-escalation training, systems for transit agencies nationwide to track assault data and report that data to the Department of Transportation.
  • Detroit Free Press: They look like cops, but they're not

    A Detroit Free Press investigation found that police agencies across Michigan are supplementing their ranks with unlicensed civilians, commonly called reserve officers, who wear uniforms and badges and carry guns. But these volunteers are unregulated and not subject to state-established training standards, despite frequently assisting real cops on patrol and, sometimes, with arrests. No one had ever tallied the number of reserve officers in Michigan, so the Free Press did and uncovered a staggering number, and many who had committed crimes and other misdeeds.
  • CNN: "Destroyed"

    Destroyed is a multimedia investigation that revealed law enforcement agencies nationwide have destroyed rape kit evidence before the statutes of limitations expired to prosecute reported sex crimes. CNN found that the destruction of this evidence happened after flawed and incomplete police investigations. The project spurred immediate action from lawmakers and other leaders seeking to protect rape kits from destruction.
  • Case Cleared: How Rape Goes Unpunished In America, Newsy, Reveal from the Center For Investigative Reporting & PRX, ProPublica

    “Case Cleared” uncovered how police agencies across America are masking the truth about how often they get justice for rape victims. Dozens of major jurisdictions are inflating clearance rates for rape by making cases look solved when they are simply closed with no arrest. In some cases, suspects find new victims after being left on the street by police. Reporters also discovered a major flaw in the FBI’s new national uniform crime reporting system. The findings surprised elected leaders and senior DOJ and FBI officials, while prompting immediate and significant action at both the local and national levels.
  • Bulletproof

    Police wear body armor, but that doesn't stop criminals from killing them. FOX31 analyzed cop killings nationwide to show how design flaws allow bullets to skip through vests. In addition, the team exposed local police agencies which failed to provide their force with basic safety gear.