Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "agencies" ...

  • Waste and Violence at Colorado Human Services

    Waste and Violence at Colorado Human Services is a broad investigation into the policies and practices that have led state officials to squander millions, increase benefits to people not qualified for the money and allow repeated attacks on staff and others at their facilities. Despite stalling and refusal to release some records, Watchdog.org went over road blocks, obtaining records from other agencies and sources, to tell the story. During four months, Watchdog.org found the state repeatedly violated federal law, changed policies to increase welfare benefits and made changes that endangered staff at its juvenile detention facilities.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate. After Dance’s articles appeared, Dando agreed to give up his license so that Maryland charges would be dropped, an inspector general highlighted flaws in licensing procedures,and the Maryland Board of Physicians proposed legislation to require background checks.
  • The Pentagon Finally Details its Weapons-for-Cops Giveaway

    The Marshall Project, in collaboration with MuckRock, published, for the first time, agency-level data on the Pentagon's 1033 program, a program brought to light during the protests in Ferguson, Mo., in which the Pentagon gives surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to law enforcement agencies. We wrote an initial story on the data, created an easy-to-use, embeddable widget, and put together a "Department of Defense gift guide," highlighting some of the more perplexing giveaways. The story led to unprecedented public scrutiny of military equipment going to law enforcement agencies, as over forty local news outlets published articles detailing what their local cops had received.
  • Trail of Troubles

    One doctor’s sexual assault charges led reporter Scott Dance to uncover the state’s lack of oversight of the criminal backgrounds of Maryland’s doctors. Maryland does not conduct criminal background checks of its doctors despite at least one attempt to require them. Dr. William Dando was one doctor who fell through the cracks. He was convicted of rape in the 1980s, and came to Maryland to pursue his medical career after his release. Fast forward to 2014, and the same doctor was accused of sexually assaulting several patients. Dance traced Dando’s time in Maryland and all of the ways his past could have been discovered, but state regulatory agencies and medical boards failed to investigate.
  • State offices ignore freedom of information laws

    Through a comprehensive survey involving more than 80 state open records requests, the Press & Sun-Bulletin conducted a first-of-its-kind examination of compliance by New York's state agencies with part of the state Freedom of Information Law that is intended to let the public know what records are kept by various agencies. The newspaper documented 79 of 86 agencies, including Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office, were not complying with the law. The story led to immediate and ongoing corrective action.
  • Deaths in Detention

    This project was the first-ever analysis of 18 people who died in the custody of law enforcement agencies throughout Milwaukee County during the five-year period ending in 2012, not including suspects shot by police. At least 10 of them had medical or psychiatric conditions that were improperly monitored or left untreated by authorities. None of the 18 custody deaths resulted in criminal charges against an officer. Discipline was handed down in just two cases — both under the jurisdiction of the Sheriff’s Department — and the punishment of many of the officers was overturned. The Journal Sentinel analysis found that in the aftermath of in-custody deaths, pathologists, prosecutors and law enforcement rely on each others’ conclusions — even when those conclusions are flawed — ensuring no one is held accountable when prisoners die.
  • Waiting for Help

    The breaking news was a mobile home fire on a bitterly cold night. A WSPA photographer captured the aftermath, wrecked home, shivering children, flashing lights on the trucks. The people there, the neighbors mostly, kept asking the same question, “Why did it take so long for firefighters to show up?” It was easy to check and see just how long it took those first responders to arrive and the answer didn’t make sense. WSPA discovered the 911 calls from the fire gave all the correct information including the right address and a full description of the emergency. 911 dispatchers heard that information clearly and repeated it back exactly. Then, they sent the wrong stations to the wrong address in a different city. WSPA used dispatch logs, 911 recordings and interviews to expose a problem with the automated dispatch software that was happening in agencies across the area. With lives at stake, a simple oversight was causing dangerous delays. As a result of WSPA's report, the 911 agency promised sweeping changes. The follow-up reports hold them accountable for that effort.
  • Korean CIA's Scandal- Spy Evidence Forgery

    From 2008 to 2014, the NIS (National Intelligence Service)has found and indicted 21 spies disguised as North Korean defectors, but the Korean Center for investigative Journalism’s investigation revealed there was no evidence of any spy activities for 2 of the spies indicted after 2012. This discovery led to exoneration of those two people. The KCIJ also discovered that the NIS had submitted fabricated evidence against Mr. Yoo Woo-sung to the court. After the KCIJ reported this discovery through an investigation in China, the Korean court contacted the Chinese government, which confirmed that the document was forged. The Korean prosecution indicted 4 NIS employees who were involved in the fabrication, who then, in turn, received prison sentences.
  • Going Platinum: Gaming the System

    NBC Bay Area exposed an ongoing scheme by the head of Santa Clara County’s Department of Child Support Services in which he used a personal credit card for over a hundred thousand dollars of reimbursable department charges in order to rack up travel rewards points on the public’s dime. Through several public records requests and meticulous data entry and analysis, the team exposed the Director's passion for points drove him to exploit his position for financial gain and violate county purchasing policy. Our investigation shed light on a county department tainted by abuse of power, longstanding violations and questionable ethics The team’s reporting sparked investigations by state agencies, a change in leadership and his ultimate firing.
  • The CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley: Bringing Home America’s Fallen Correspondent: Chip Rei

    Four-story series on waste and mismanagement within the Pentagon agencies responsible for bringing home the remains of 83,000 US military personnel who never returned from battle. Despite a budget of more than $100 million, the series revealed the POW/MIA Accounting Community, as it is officially known, has a very poor record of repatriating and identifying remains. In fact, the Pentagon’s results were eclipsed by those of a non-profit charity whose work we carefully documented. Two days after our first story ran, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered a thorough review of the sprawling Pentagon bureaucracy. The CBS reporters followed up with another story when Hagel ordered a massive reorganization. The story included interviews with family members who endured years of agony while they pleaded for answers from the Pentagon. CBS also reported on a highly critical DoD Inspector General’s report months before it was officially released. The fourth story in the series tracked the work of History Flight, a charity that has successfully recovered WWII remains on the Pacific Island of Tarawa. CBS reporters traveled to Tarawa with six US Marines, now in their 90s, on their first return visit since they fought there in 1943. The series documented the emotional scene as they witnessed History Flight’s painstaking recovery of their fellow Marines. http://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/115438489/56d862cc1e