Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "aid" ...

  • Yemen’s Dirty War: An Associated Press Investigation

    A year-long investigative series revealing how key players in Yemen’s dirty war have engaged in atrocities and corruption — torturing prisoners, deploying child soldiers and stealing food aid intended for the starving.
  • WBTV Investigates: Hurricane Recovery Delays

    Two hurricanes devastated parts of eastern North Carolina two years apart: Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Florence in 2018. Despite the gap, the state had made little progress in helping victims of Hurricane Matthew get back in their owns by the time Florence hit. For the past year, we've uncovered problem after problem with the state's efforts to administer hundreds of millions of dollars in federal disaster aid. Our work has prompted multiple legislative hearings; the creation of a legislative investigative committee and the formation of a new state disaster recovery office.
  • VicAd: Port Politics

    When disgraced former Congressman Blake Farenthold resurfaced as the Calhoun Port Authority's first full-time lobbyist at an annual salary of $160,000, the public was outraged. Farenthold later said in a deposition that he and the port board thought they could weather this initial storm and continue to do business as they always had outside the public view. All other state and national media quickly moved on from the story, but the Victoria Advocate kept digging and found that the public had a lot more to be outraged about.
  • CBC: Unassisted Death

    In a powerful series of stories, CBC Edmonton revealed the devastating human cost of the medical-assistance-in-dying (MAID) policy of Alberta’s massive Catholic health provider, Covenant Health. By default, Covenant's policy prohibited patients from even signing their MAID request forms, or undergoing eligibility assessments by provincial medical staff, on its publicly funded property. Covenant Health also explicitly prohibits assisted deaths from taking place in its facilities.
  • The Lens: Power Plant Astroturfing

    Lens reporter Michael Isaac Stein confirmed that actors were paid to support Entergy New Orleans' proposed power plant in eastern New Orleans. A city investigation resulted. The company was forced to release thousands of pages of documents about the power plant campaign, which we found was much larger in scope than the so-called "astroturfing" in 2017 and 2018.
  • The Daily News: The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund

    During the course of reporting on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Daily News reporter Thomas Tracy spoke with an official on the record who said that the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was running out of money. Tracy broke the news exclusively that the fund would not have enough money to help all survivors sickened at Ground Zero.
  • The Daily News: Carting Company Expose

    Garbage truck driver Sean Spence fatally ran down two people in the Bronx and drove himself further into trouble by lying about one of his victims.The embattled Sanitation Salvage employee lied to police about his first crash last November, telling cops that an off-the-books worker who was helping on his route was a crazed homeless man who suddenly jumped on the side of his rig, sources with knowledge of the case said. Ultimately, the company closed down.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Tax Breaks: The Favored Few

    In February 2018, Congress passed a massive budget bill, and President Donald Trump signed it. It provided new money for the military. It funded disaster relief efforts. And it raised the nation’s “debt ceiling” — allowing the government to secure new loans. While these provisions grabbed headlines amid the chaos of what was, at best, a slapdash scramble to pass a budget and avert another government shutdown, a gaggle of goodies, benefiting a bevy of special interests, slipped into the bill’s 652 pages almost unnoticed. These goodies are called “tax extenders.” Seeing an opportunity to boldly tell an effectively untold tale, the staff of the Center for Public Integrity endeavored to explain how every tax extender — more than 30 in all — came to fruition and reveal how lobbyists gamed the political system and squeezed $16 billion worth of special favors from it. This project represented a rare example of deep investigative reporting on Congress. While hundred of reporters cover what Mitch MCConnell and Nancy Pelosi said yesterday, very few unravel how the institution of Congress is corrupted.
  • The Center for Public Integrity and NPR: Medicaid, Under the Influence

    A joint investigation by the Center for Public Integrity and NPR produced a damning examination of one key reason why Medicaid costs are soaring: The pharmaceutical industry has infiltrated the systems that states use to control Medicaid drug costs.
  • Tangled up in debt

    In late 2017, The Hechinger Report began a deep dive into cosmetology education in Iowa, an education marketplace that has long eluded scrutiny and whose graduates comprise a poorly paid and “invisible” workforce. For-profit beauty schools have maintained a near-monopoly on the sector and kept state regulations to their liking, and where, despite the schools’ hefty price tags, student earnings years after graduation often remain low. The story was a collaboration with The New York Times.