Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • Maine Power Grab

    A Bangor Daily News investigation found that hundreds of thousands of Maine customers of competitive electricity providers have paid $50 million more than they needed to for power since 2012.
  • Against the Odds

    The Charlotte Observer found lottery players who beat staggering odds so consistently that statisticians said chances of being that lucky were less than one in a trillion.
  • Mississippi Child Care Crisis

    Mississippi has some of the lowest standards for child care centers in the country and some of the weakest oversight. The Hechinger Report joined with the Clarion-Ledger to investigate how the state fails to serve all its children well, why it falls short and possible solutions. Our 18-month investigation revealed a child care system in Mississippi plagued by a lack of funding and support. We looked into low standards and pay for child care center employees, difficulties parents face in finding and paying for childcare, and years of legislative inaction in improving conditions for children. We highlighted solutions for the state, such as the Department of Defense’s strong child care system, and investigated trends, such as frequent absences among child care center directors. In December, Mississippi officials said the state would adopt a host of new strategies meant to reform the system, many of them similar to the best practices we wrote about.
  • Bordering on Insecurity

    The Texas Tribune's yearlong project, Bordering on Insecurity, dissected the dynamics of illegal immigration and enforcement, laid waste to political myths, and offered readers an intellectually honest understanding of the criminal activities that threaten the nation's southern border.
  • Prison Broke

    The Pitch's investigation revealed millions of dollars were quietly paid to Missouri prison guards who were harassed and retaliated against by supervisors and coworkers. The director resigned amid state probes.
  • Visiting Judges Costs

    There are no limits on time off for elected officials, including county judges. When a judge is absent and has hearings scheduled, then a visiting judge is paid to fill-in. The money a visiting judge earns is paid out of tax dollars. One county judge has been absent over a month for three years.
  • Obamacare: Insurance Lost

    One week after President Obama touted the supposed affordability of Obamacare, claiming it costs less than $75 a month for most people, we found there was no state in which average policies priced anywhere close to $75: the national average was quadruple. Premium increases and higher deductibles provided such sticker shock that many Americans began giving up their insurance altogether, creating what we discovered to be a new class of uninsured under Obamacare. We learned that almost all of the increase in the number of insured has been due to Medicaid expansion under Obamacare, not the marketplace. We also demonstrated that just because you have a plastic insurance card in your wallet doesn’t mean your health services are covered: Millions are forced to buy health insurance, under the Affordable Care Act, that’s of little value until they pay tens of thousands out of pocket annually. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVbNVJ5qe8o
  • Derby Pain Clinic's High Prescribing Of Cancer Drug Extends Beyond Nurse

    Culling and analyzing newly released data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, C-HIT Senior Writer Lisa Chedekel found an interesting prescribing pattern: four nurse practitioners, all affiliated with a tiny Derby pain clinic, prescribed nearly all of the state's Medicare spending for the opioid painkiller Subsys. The nurses were responsible for 279 prescriptions for Subsys, at a cost of $2.3 million in 2014. Nationally, only 10 nurse practitioners prescribed Subsys - with the majority of prescriptions written by doctors.
  • Desperate Choices: Giving Up Custody For Care

    Lisa Chedekel, senior writer, Connecticut Health I-Team, uncovered a practice within the state's Department of Children and Families (DCF) of coercing parents of children with severe behavioral problems to give up custody of their children, in exchange for needed care. Although DCF officials said the practice was rare, C-HIT found that more than 860 children were given up to state custody since 2011 because their families could not access "specialized care." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfa8wsOdrog
  • Reliving Agent Orange

    Four decades after the Vietnam War, scientists are still learning how exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange has harmed veterans and their children. This report showed that the Department of Veterans Affairs has hesitated to compensate sick veterans, instead weighing political and financial costs in secret. To bolster their position, they found that government officials have routinely turned to a known skeptic of Agent Orange’s deadly effects – a scientist who has also been paid by the chemical makers. And they obtained internal VA data on hundreds of thousands of vets and conducted a first-of-its-kind analysis, producing new evidence suggesting a connection between Agent Orange and birth defects that experts say should force the government to take action. https://www.propublica.org/article/agent-orange-vietnam-veterans-their-families-share-stories-exposure https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/alvin-young