Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "aid" ...

  • Cash for Compliance?

    In their ongoing "Cash for Compliance?" series, the reporters revealed how a group called Advocates for Individuals with Disabilities (AID) grossly exploited the Americans with Disabilities Act and leveraged it into a money-making machine cloaked as a non-profit organization. The reporters have produced more than two dozen stories that systematically unraveled AID's multi-layered enterprise and showed its deception, hypocrisy, motives and players. Their major findings include: - AID’s own facilities had the same violations as the 1700 businesses they’ve sued. - No one with disabilities ever visited the businesses AID sued. - The IRS granted AID official non-profit status. However, on its IRS application, the reporters uncovered AID didn’t disclose any information about its lawsuits and its plan to self-fund through litigation. The reporters also revealed that AID set up other business entities that shuffle funds. - AID is secretly funded and backed by a controversial entrepreneur with a history of consumer fraud. - The lead attorney for AID has a history of ethical violations. The reporters also discovered that he made repeated mistakes in AID’s lawsuits. The State Bar of Arizona has interviewed many of the people featured in their reports.
  • Unclaimed Bodies

    This project recounts what happens to the unclaimed dead in the state of Maryland. The reporters followed a disgruntled granddaughter who said she did not want her grandmother used for medical science. But grandma's husband--whom she met in a nursing home and had been married to for just a few months--didn't want to deal with the body and was ready to let the body go unclaimed. Unclaimed bodies in Maryland are used for medical science, and all of them have stories. Here's Nancy Porter and the granddaughter who fought to keep her relative off the operating table.
  • Walmart. Thousands of police calls. You paid the bill.

    Walmart shifts security burdens to Tampa Bay police departments and the taxpayers that fund them, producing more calls for officers than anywhere else, often for small problems that don’t rise to the level of real crime.
  • What Does Gun Violence Really Cost?

    For our May/June 2015 cover story, we sought to answer a simple question: Why doesn’t anyone know what gun violence costs? Led by national affairs editor Mark Follman, MoJo reporters worked with an economist to crunch complicated datasets to find the answer: $229 billion—about the same as the obesity epidemic. They laid out the data in compelling charts and videos, reported on the forces that suppress research, and profiled survivors bankrupted and forced to navigate their lives in wheelchairs. The package was the first to exhaustively outline the economic, social, and human costs of gun violence and it made waves on Capitol Hill. Sen. Chris Murphy said “This new report from Mother Jones will make silence just a little harder from now on.” Just weeks later President Obama addressed the issue for the first time in a speech to the nation’s mayors, saying gun violence “costs you money…It costs this country dearly.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcxeVBPH-1w https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvW5gD8YYUA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nook1b8EyTs
  • Outside the Lines: Pete Rose Investigation

    Former Cincinnati Reds star Pete Rose said for years that he had never bet on baseball. Then, with a new book being released 11 years ago, Rose admitted to gambling on baseball when he was a manager, and only in a narrow two-year window. As he sought reinstatement to the game earlier this year, Rose maintained that he never bet on baseball when he was an active player. However, an Outside the Lines exclusive report called that denial into question, and ultimately impacted Rose's request for reinstatement. https://youtu.be/xcph3vjHexM
  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.
  • Nuclear Risks

    The Obama administration has waged an international campaign to lock down nuclear explosive materials over the past seven years, to stem the risk that a terrorist might detonate a bomb in New York, Washington, or elsewhere. But three countries in particular have proved immune to U.S. pressures for better safeguards: South Africa, Russia, and India. Our deep investigations into their nuclear activities laid bare a toxic mix of ineptitude, nationalism, and greed – and not just in foreign capitals – that keeps the world at risk.
  • Facebook Posts Lead to Gang Conspiracy Charges

    Voice of San Diego managing editor Sara Libby revealed how San Diego's district attorney tried to send a local resident named Aaron Harvey to prison for the rest of his life for a shooting that prosecutors and everyone else admitted he didn't commit. Instead, the district attorney said his Facebook posts showed he should be held responsible for the crime through a novel interpretation of the state's gang conspiracy laws. After Libby's reporting, the case against Harvey was thrown out and the DA vowed never to use similar charges again.
  • The Real War on Families—Why the U.S. Needs Paid Leave Now

    This groundbreaking investigative report reveals the staggering toll on new mothers who must return to work within weeks or days of childbirth. Lerner’s report profiles mothers around the country who went back to work as quickly as 7 days after childbirth, and describes in heartbreaking detail the mental and physical costs of juggling a job and a newborn. Bureau of Labor Statistics data analyzed for In These Times’ report showed that 1 in 4 women return to work within two weeks of childbirth. The report serves as a vital intervention—at a time when calls for paid parental leave in the United States are growing at both the state and federal level—putting the severity of the issue into stark relief by adding a human face to it.
  • Sale of Ammunition to Minors

    In the national debate over gun control, we discovered little attention is focused on the sale of ammunition to minors. We went undercover to see if federally licensed firearms dealers followed the law regarding ammunition sales to minors.