Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "appeal" ...

  • The Hartford Courant's five-year fight for Adam Lanza documents

    The Hartford Courant waged a five-year battle for documents seized from Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter Adam Lanza's house and the resulting stories provided the most-detailed picture of one of the country's most-notorious mass killers.
  • Military.com: Aviators Kicked Out

    The U.S. military prides itself on its colorblind attitude to race and its increasing diversity. Why, then, does the field of naval aviation remain overwhelmingly white, and less diverse in some areas now than two decades ago? Three black aviators who share remarkably similar stories of getting expelled from the training pipeline say unconscious bias is to blame. These former trainees, some of whom remain in appeals with the Navy, say they're just as good as their white peers, and an instructor backs their assertions. Investigations, formal complaints, and a troubling aviation instructors' chat history paint a picture of an environment that dooms minority aviators from the moment they set foot on the flightline.
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers. http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/09/08/gov-doug-ducey-forces-out-juvenile-corrections-chief-dona-markley-after-questionable-firings/90094760/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/10/31/fired-arizona-workers-inundate-call-center-appealing-get-jobs-back/93083666/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/11/23/gov-doug-ducey-fires-arizona-des-chief-tim-jeffries/94350606/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/12/23/arizona-rehire-40-des-workers-227-remain-fired/95795356/
  • Most who fail get a pass

    Georgia law mandates that students in grades 3, 5, and 8 pass standardized tests in certain subjects to move on to the next grade. Our analysis showed school districts were ignoring the law - with the blessing of the state education department - by regularly using an appeals process that was supposed to be a last resort.
  • Our Financial Mess

    The series explores the confluence of factors led Memphis to the brink of financial disaster: the city's mass exodus and population loss over 40 years, its aggressive and expensive growth-by-annexation policy, its overly generous pension and health benefit packages for employees, the overwhelming costs of public safety. http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/investigations/our-financial-mess-365655741.html
  • Child Predators in the Military

    Over six months of reporting, including filing numerous federal Freedom of Information Act requests and appeals to unearth details of scores of cases, The Associated Press found that the largest category of criminals in the military prison system are in for sex crimes against children. It also found that harsh sentences announced publicly were substantially reduced under plea agreements that were not routinely disclosed, and that military proceedings are opaque compared with the degree of openness of civilian courts. The lack of transparency made accessing the records needed for this story a significant challenge. http://www.sfgate.com/news/item/AP-interactive-Military-child-sex-assaults-48405.php
  • A Losing Battle

    “A Losing Battle” delves into the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (BCMR), a little-known internal panel mandated to “correct errors or remove injustices” on service members’ military records, including overturning a discharge that left them without medical benefits for service-related injuries. We found that when service members filed appeals that could lay significant blame on the Army or cost a lot of money, the default answer was no. Our investigation found that the Board routinely denied applicants their due process, uniformly denying in-person hearings, refusing to admit evidence and not responding to evidence brought, leaving service members with nowhere else to seek justice within the Armed Forces.
  • The Echo Chamber

    A comprehensive examination of the Supreme Court’s secretive appeals process reveals how a cadre of corporate lawyers wields extraordinary, outsized influence.
  • Harsh Treatment

    In Illinois, hundreds of juvenile state wards are assaulted and raped by their peers each year at taxpayer-funded residential treatment centers as authorities fail to act on reports of harm and continue sending waves of youths to the most violent facilities, the Tribune's "Harsh Treatment" investigation found. Prostitution becomes a fact of life at facilities where experienced residents introduce others to pimps, escort websites and street corners. And thousands of kids flee to the streets, where some sold drugs and sex to survive and others broke into homes and mugged passers-by. Dozens have never been found. The reporters gathered thousands of pages of highly protected juvenile case files, successfully petitioned the Cook County juvenile court for access to delinquency files and through relentless FOIA appeals pried free police and state monitoring reports on violent incidents inside the facilities.
  • Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power

    Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power is a series of reports on the exercise of power by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and his administration. The stories investigate his administration’s use of the busiest bridge in the world to take political revenge on a small-town mayor; the operation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for the political and financial benefit of his administration and his friends and donors; and the use of federal Sandy aid to strong arm the mayor of Hoboken. These reports focused national attention on a leading Republican candidate in the 2016 presidential race. Plus, they established the narrative both for national and local coverage and for state and federal investigations of the administration. Most important, WNYC uncovered key information about the politicization of public entities by an elected official whose appeal to voters is based on the perception that he is above politics. Our submission for review by the IRE includes our most significant work on this story. Our reporting resulted in the forced resignation of Gov. Christie’s top man at the Port Authority, a bi-state agency that controls $8 billion in annual revenue raised largely from tolls and fares paid by commuters of this region. In addition, WNYC’s in-depth reports on the Port Authority prompted criminal investigations by the Manhattan District Attorney and the Securities and Exchange Commission into the misuse of Port Authority funds. It led the United States Attorney for New Jersey to widen its investigation into conflicts of interest by David Samson, the Port Authority Chair, and a close Christie ally. And the reporting has spurred the creation of a bi-state panel to reform the Port Authority, as well as reform measures in the New Jersey and New York Legislatures.