Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "buildings" ...

  • How Much are you Overpaying in Property Tax?

    In 2016, an apartment building in Athens County took out a loan for $48.3 million. Yet it was paying property tax as if it were valued at $13.8 million, a whopping $35 million difference. When the Cleveland Plain Dealer first reported on this in 2018, it got us thinking: there's a lot of great data out there that we could put together to see how much this actually costs our readers.
  • The Killing Rooms of Mosul

    Mosul’s reconstruction – investigating the continued impact of the worst urban fighting since the Second World War. We wanted to measure the scale of the devastation in Mosul’s Old City and understand what the residents were still going through nine months after the fighting had ended. What we found was a traumatized city with dead bodies still rotting in the open, and buildings containing terrible secrets of violence, death, and possible un-investigated war crimes.
  • STLPR: McKee's broken promises

    Nearly a decade after Paul McKee sold St. Louis on a vision worth billions to rehab more than 150 properties on the city’s north side, roofs have caved, walls have crumbled and residents have lost patience — and hope. This story looks at how this happened, what the implications are and who is impacted.
  • Kids on the Line: An investigation into the contractors behind family separation

    As the U.S. government’s family separation policy played out in real time, Reveal’s investigation uncovered major problems with the contractors tasked with caring for immigrant children, including a defense company holding immigrant children in unlicensed facilities -- vacant office buildings in Phoenix without yards, showers or kitchens -- and a Texas shelter drugging immigrant children without their consent.
  • Bay Area News Group: Burned Out

    An exclusive data analysis that revealed how fire inspectors across the San Francisco Bay Area routinely fail to perform state-required safety inspections at schools and apartment buildings -- and how, despite the potential for tragedy, there are no consequences — and nobody paying attention — to make sure they are getting the job done.
  • Sea Level Rise

    The Bay Area's current waterfront building frenzy includes at least $21 billion in housing and commercial construction in low-lying areas that climate scientists say could flood by the end of the century. In examining approval processes for new buildings on the edge of San Francisco Bay, our team found that some cities are greenlighting waterfront development without planning for the long term or fully accounting for the future costs of reconfiguring large projects to resist flooding.
  • Lax building inspections, lurking danger

    When a building collapsed in Center City Philadelphia, killing six people and injuring 13, attention quickly focused on the reckless demolition contractor who cut corners in taking down the building. Then it shifted to the city agency charged with overseeing demolitions and ensuring safety. Chagrined city officials pledged safety reforms and stepped up enforcement. An Inquirer investigation revealed just how empty those promises were and documented dangerous conditions in buildings across the city.
  • Rape on the Night Shift / Violación de un sueño

    At the end of the day, when most of the world go home, a nearly invisible workforce clocks in. Many janitors are women who work at night in empty buildings, in isolation, and that can put them in danger. https://www.revealnews.org/nightshift/
  • CLOSING COSTS

    In an unprecedented move -- billed to cut costs -- Chicago Public Schools shut down 49 of their school buildings in the summer of 2013, leaving them vacant and abandoned. Late in the fall of 2013, NBC5 Investigates filed a FOIA request to see how much was still being spent on these empty buildings in utility costs. For months, CPS delayed and then ignored our FOIA request, and it ultimately took a lawsuit by NBC5 to finally get CPS to turn over the documents, They showed that taxpayers were spending nearly as much on utilities for these vacant buildings as they were when the schools were open. NBC5 Investigates also obtained secret CPS reports showing extensive vandalism at some abandoned schools, resulting in additional costs for taxpayers to repair the damage.
  • FEMA's Fickle Flood Maps

    We've read for years now about anger at the high costs to property owners of changes to FEMA's flood maps, but we hadn't read this before: As homeowners around the nation protest skyrocketing premiums for federal flood insurance, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has quietly moved the lines on its flood maps to benefit hundreds of oceanfront condo buildings and million-dollar homes, according to an analysis of federal records by NBC News. Reporters Bill Dedman and Miranda Leitsinger produced a three-part series showing that FEMA had approved those revisions -- removing more than 500 waterfront properties from the highest-risk flood zone and saving the owners as much as 97 percent on the premiums they pay into the financially strained National Flood Insurance Program – even as owners of homes and businesses far from a water source were being added to the maps asked to pay far more for their coverage.