Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "convicted felons" ...

  • AP: Cops Sell Guns

    After a year’s worth of work, the AP found that law enforcement agencies in Washington state sold about 6,000 guns that had been confiscated during criminal investigations, and more than a dozen of those firearms later became evidence in new investigations. The weapons were used to threaten people, seized at gang hangouts, discovered in drug houses, possessed illegally by convicted felons, found hidden in a stolen car, taken from a man who was suffering a mental health crisis and used by an Army veteran to commit suicide.
  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.
  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.
  • Security Breach

    "From broken metal detectors to convicted felons carrying police badges and guns, WTTG-TV's hidden camera investigation of the DC Protective Service Police Department (DCPSD) showed how anyone armed with a weapon could easily slip through security inside District government buildings."
  • Holes in the System: Ohio's Missing Fingerprints

    The State of Ohio's database is missing tens of thousands of criminal records used to perform background checks on job applicants for both public and private employers. Without the information, a convicted felon could potentially be hired for a position their conviction would usually preclude them from obtaining. The investigation found that local courts were not fingerprinting defendants who were summoned to court rather than being arrested. The state's computers do not accept a conviction without fingerprints. After finding many examples of convicted criminals' records not existing in the database, the reporters further discovered that some state officials were aware of the issue, but had been slow to act.
  • Reputation on the Line

    This series of stories uncovered a tangled web of relationships, both professional and personal, between Cook County official, Des Plaines city employees, convicted felons, and shareholders of casinos and billboard companies.
  • Living in Exile

    Colorado Project Exile, a program implemented by Tom Strickland, convicted felons caught with firearms faced harsh federal prosecution. Possession of a gun by anyone convicted of any crime, regardless of severity, could serve a federal prison sentence and face up to twenty years under this program. Holthouse examines what happens when Project Exile targets people with non-violent criminal records who did not use a firearm in a previous offense. And what of those persons who have no criminal record who were still targeted by Project Exile? Strickland wanted to change the culture of gun violence in America. And Holthouse's article checks to see if the program does, in fact, do that.
  • Justice Withheld

    In 1941, Florida legislators passed a law that allows judges to block records of the convictions of felony offenders, sparing them a life of potential economic hardship and the scorn associated with being convicted felons. It was intended to be a one-time break to help first-time offenders, but it allows people to say they have never been convicted of a crime. The Herald examined how widespread "withholds" had become across Florida and who had been receiving them. The reporters analyzed a database containing millions of prison and probation records, finding that this law intended as a one-time break for first-time offenders had turned into something much more.
  • Bedside Felons

    From the contest entry summary: "More than 90 convicted felons, many found guilty of violent assault, sex crimes or theft, are licensed by the state of New York to work as aides in nursing homes with sometimes dangerous consequences for vulnerable residents." To obtain criminal court electronic databases and identify licensed workers, the newspaper had to sue state officials under New York's Freedom of Information Law.
  • Who's driving the bus?

    WITI found that because of a gaping hole in state law, murderers, sex offenders, drug dealers, and other convicted felons are legally driving Wisconsin school buses.