Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "criminal justice system" ...

  • The Marshall Project and Los Angeles Times: The Great California Prison Experiment

    The Great California Prison Experiment examines the impacts on public safety of the state’s criminal justice reform measures that dramatically reduced the prison population.
  • Star Tribune: Denied Justice

    “Denied Justice” documented widespread failings in how Minnesota’s criminal justice system investigated and prosecuted sexual assault cases, depriving victims of justice, endangering the public and allowing rapists to go unpunished.
  • SB Tribune/ProPublica: Criminal Justice in Elkhart, Indiana

    Reports by the South Bend Tribune and ProPublica revealed deep flaws and abuses of power in the criminal justice system in Elkhart, Indiana -- from new revelations in the wrongful convictions of two innocent men, to the promotions of police supervisors with serious disciplinary records, to the mishandling of police misconduct cases -- and led to the resignation of the police chief, an independent investigation of the department and criminal charges against two officers.
  • L.A. Times: How California Law Shielded Dishonest Cops

    For decades, California’s strict police privacy laws made it nearly impossible for anyone to find out basic information about police officer misconduct. A team of Los Angeles Times reporters spent months investigating the impact of this secrecy on the criminal justice system. They found that officers caught for dishonesty and other serious wrongdoing were able to continue testifying in court without prosecutors, defendants, judges and jurors ever finding out about their past. Countless defendants were convicted based on the testimony of these officers. Published at the height of a political debate over making police records public, the stories helped galvanize support to change state law and open up some records about officer misconduct, which had been kept confidential for 40 years.
  • Influence & Injustice: An investigation into the power of prosecutors

    When it comes to racial bias in Florida's criminal justice system, there's plenty of blame to go around. Judges say prosecutors are the most responsible because they control the plea negotiation process where 95 percent of cases are resolved, But while prosecutors are the most powerful people in the system, that power varies based on where they practice and the relative influence of other actors – judges, public defenders, private attorneys, law enforcement officers and even juries.
  • In The Dark Season 2

    In the Dark is an investigative podcast that raises profound questions about whether the criminal justice system in America is fair and just. Season Two investigates the case of Curtis Flowers, a black man on death row in Mississippi who has been tried six times for the same crime. Over 11 episodes, the product of more than a year’s worth of meticulous reporting and data analysis, In the Dark reveals what can happen when the power of a prosecutor goes unchecked.
  • Getting Guns Out of Dangerous Hands

    KING 5's reporting led to a new law in Washington state and a new task force targeting people who are prohibited from owning guns. The stories focused on gun laws that are supposed to keep firearms out of the hands of two classes of dangerous people: Those with criminal records, and those accused of domestic violence. Two separate series of investigative reports revealed that those laws were not enforced by the criminal justice system, and victims were paying for that with their lives.
  • Boston Globe: Secret Courts

    "Secret Courts" exposed the darkest corner of the Massachusetts criminal justice system. Criminal cases, including felony charges of vehicle homicide and rape, are held in closed-door hearings -- often in private offices without public notice -- and the outcome is up to the discretion of a single court official who may not have a law degree. No other state has anything like it.
  • 48 Hours: All-American Murder

    In “All-American Murder,” a one-hour 48 HOURS special reported by best-selling author James Patterson, we unravel the complicated life of Aaron Hernandez, a young NFL star who seemingly had it all yet wound up accused of multiple murders and ultimately killed himself in a Massachusetts prison cell. The report features interviews with people who knew Aaron Hernandez at all stages of his life and addresses the question of whether football, the one thing Hernandez loved more than anything, was responsible for his demise.
  • The Intercept: Group that opposes sex work gave money to prosecutors’ offices – and got stings against johns in return

    This was an investigative piece that relied heavily on documents obtained through FOIA requests and revealed that prosecutors around the country were receiving millions of dollars in funding from an anti-prostitution advocacy group that required them in return to conduct raids on brothels and stings against sex work clients. In particular, internal documents showed that in exchange for nearly $200,000 in funding, the advocacy group essentially required the King County prosecutors’ office and their law enforcement to erroneously label criminal cases they were pursuing as sex trafficking even though there was no evidence of trafficking in these cases. At one point, the advocacy group was even allowed to edit a press release issued by the prosecutors about these cases to include terms like “sex trafficking.” Legal scholars said that the King County prosecutors may have violated their own professional codes of conduct that restricts them from making sensationalistic “extra-judicial comments that have a substantial likelihood of heightening public condemnation of the accused.” My article was the first to show that the independent judgement of law enforcement in King County and other jurisdictions may have been compromised by the strings-attached funding from Demand Abolition, the anti-prostitution group.