Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "data journalism" ...

  • In Donors We Trust

    This entry features the Detroit Free Press' innovative and exhaustive look into irregularities in the management of the University of Michigan’s $11 billion endowment. The years-long investigation detailed how executives at some of the nation's top investment firms donated hundreds of millions of dollars to the University of Michigan while the university in turn invested as much as $4 billion in those companies' funds. More than $400 million of that amount was sent into funds managed by three alumni who advise the university on the investments of its endowment. Critics who reviewed the newspaper’s computational and statistical analysis said Michigan’s approach of investing with some of its top donors, who also help guide the university's endowment, creates a conflict. After the publication of more than a dozen stories throughout 2018, the university reformed its conflict-of-interest rules; its president apologized for a lack in oversight; a member of its board of regents returned more than $20,000 in campaign contributions from an investment fund leader; and voters ousted both board incumbents running for re-election.
  • Bias In Olympic Figure Skating Judging

    Figure skating, unlike other subjective judged Olympic sports, lets national sports federations decide who will judge athletes. This apparently creates an incentive for bias. Judges know they have to please their national sports federation to go to the Olympics. These judges give higher scores when their own country’s athletes perform. Nationalistic bias is measurable. In addition, NBC News roughly a fifth of the judges in the pool to judge the games hold or have held leadership positions in their national skating federations. We went further and during the Olympics named the names of judges who showed the most bias in scoring. One of those judges was later sanctioned - the first time a judge has ever been sanctioned for statistically showing bias.
  • Postmedia: Follow the Money

    Follow the Money is a data journalism project conceived by reporter Zane Schwartz as part of a year-long Postmedia fellowship. “I was frustrated by the way donations to politicians are recorded,” says Schwartz. “We know money matters in politics, but figuring out who is consistently giving that money to candidates and parties requires a level of detective-work out of reach for the average voter.” To address this gap, Schwartz worked with a team of journalists at Postmedia to create an accessible search tool for contributions at both the federal level and in every province and territory — a first of its kind.
  • Give and Take

    The Give and Take series is an exhaustive investigation into Vermont's nonprofit organizations. They employ nearly one in five of the state's workers, but get little scrutiny. We combined shoe-leather reporting and data journalism to uncover a series of surprising stories that looked at compensation, fundraising, gaming, lobbying and more.
  • CBC Marketplace - Crying Out for Care

    Crying Out for Care was a 22-minute episode of Marketplace and digital, social, television and radio stories to reach a broad audience. Marketplace is a long-running Canadian Broadcasting Corporation investigative consumer affairs television program. its stories are presented in documentary form on the show and other versions, angles and follow-ups appear in the newscasts,news programs, website and social media of CBC. This submission includes the Marketplace episode and includes some of that other coverage. Topic: Marketplace applied data journalism techniques as well as it usual research to dig into the quality of care residents in nursing and long term care homes are receiving.
  • Stacked Up: Do Philly students have the books they need?

    Stacked Up employs data journalism to explore the hidden book crisis in Philadelphia schools. Most people would be surprised at the idea that a public school wouldn't have enough books. In Philadelphia, however, students and parents regularly complain of textbook shortages. A 10th grader at Parkway West High School told me that students often have to share books in class and can't take them home to do homework. Many books are in poor condition: "There were pictures of testicles drawn on every page," she said of one of her ninth-grade books. Access to books is particularly critical because a school today is labeled a success or failure based on students’ performance on high-stakes tests. The tests are highly specific and are aligned with state educational standards. The tests are also aligned with the textbooks sold by the 4 educational publishers that dominate the educational publishing market—the same publishers who have a hand in designing and grading the standardized tests. It therefore stands to reason that if students don’t have the right textbooks, they won’t be able to do well on the tests even if they want to.