Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "death investigation" ...

  • NJ Advance Media: Death & Dysfunction

    An 18-month NJ Advance Media investigation for The Star-Ledger and NJ.com found serious failures at nearly every level of New Jersey’s patchwork system of medical examiner offices, the obscure agencies charged with one of the most fundamental tasks: figuring out how somebody died and why. The probe revealed families left to grieve without answers or closure, innocent people sent to jail and murders still unsolved.
  • The Daily News: Carting Company Expose

    Garbage truck driver Sean Spence fatally ran down two people in the Bronx and drove himself further into trouble by lying about one of his victims.The embattled Sanitation Salvage employee lied to police about his first crash last November, telling cops that an off-the-books worker who was helping on his route was a crazed homeless man who suddenly jumped on the side of his rig, sources with knowledge of the case said. Ultimately, the company closed down.
  • DARK VALLEY

    Please consider the APTN Investigates episode “Dark Valley” which aired October 19, 2018 on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, for the Open Broadcast Feature award. Reporter/Producer Holly Moore and Reporter Rob Smith travelled to the beautiful Okanagan valley in British Columbia in July 2017 and they quickly realized that the incredible landscape held a dark secret. Five women, seemingly unconnected, had gone missing here in just two years. They vanished within an hour’s drive of one another between Vernon and Sicamous, BC.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • Carroll County Times: What Happened to Amy Metz

    The series reported on the suspicious death investigation into a Maryland's death during a snowstorm and how the lack of answers affected the woman's family.
  • The Death of Linwood Lambert

    MSNBC Chief Legal Correspondent Ari Melber’s exhaustive investigation into the death of a Virginia man in police custody. Linwood "Ray" Lambert died three years ago, after police took him to a local hospital for medical care. But police never brought Lambert inside, instead tasing him repeatedly at the doorway to the hospital, and later inside a squad car. In September, Melber obtained 80 minutes of security camera footage. Melber led a months-long investigation, combing through the video to reconstruct the incident, obtaining previously unreleased police, medical and investigative files, and interviewing dozens of sources. The material gave MSNBC an opportunity to tell the story of that deadly night for the first time. State investigators and local prosecutors provided Melber some of their first public comments on the incident. Melber’s work also spurred outcry from officials and civil rights leaders, including calls for a resolution to the case by Virginia’s governor, and both U.S. Senators from Virginia.
  • A Surgeon's Fall

    The story demonstrated how Dr. Christopher Duntsch, a Dallas neurosurgeon, was able to jump from hospital to hospital, and continue to practice, despite a documented history of injuring and killing numerous patients.
  • What killed Kenwin Garcia?

    To most in New Jersey, Kenwin Garcia, a 25-year-old from Newark, was invisible. He had no job, no kids, and spent most days in his room at his father’s house listening to reggae. So when he died in 2008 after being restrained by state troopers on the side of a busy highway, few gave the incident more than passing notice. During the next six years, the story of Garcia’s death was systematically hidden from the public. Investigative files were kept secret. When Garcia’s family sued, a judge ordered that discovery be kept confidential. And when the family settled last year, the agreement required that no one discuss anything about the case. That all changed Oct. 1, when NJ Advance Media published a stunning expose about Garcia’s death in The Star-Ledger that revealed differing accounts of what happened, serious questions about the cause of death and how troopers treated Garcia, and conflicts of interest in the system that cleared them of wrongdoing. The five-month investigation and follow-up stories led to new legislation and major changes to trooper training.
  • Post Mortem: Death Investigation in America

    "This series focused on the nation's death investigation system, the more than 2,300 coroner and medical examiner offices responsible for probing sudden and suspicious fatalities. They found a profession plagued by a widespread lack of resources, a lack of national standards or regulation, and a drastic shortage of qualified doctors."
  • Cause of Death: Negotiable

    This investigation focused on the practice of a death investigator in Bosnia. Despite questions of his practice, he continued to work and was documented soliciting money in exchange for favorable cause of death findings.