Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "detention centers" ...

  • Zero Tolerance

    ProPublica published a secret recording from inside a border patrol detention center which captured the anguish of children separated from their parents and forced the Trump Administration to reverse its family separation policy, then dug deeply into conditions at detention centers where thousands of separated children and unaccompanied minors have been sent.
  • Families behind the wall: The rise and fall of family detention

    A series of exclusive reports on alleged misconduct and abuse at the Obama administration’s family detention centers. There are more than 50 stories exposing a pattern of accused mistreatment of detainees – some of whom said they were sexually assaulted by guards in front of their children – at three federal facilities run by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement operated in rural Pennsylvania and Texas, far from any major city and the lawyers who worked there.
  • Pregnant Detainees in Immigration Detention

    Women caught up in America’s immigration detention complex are some of the most vulnerable in the world. As policy, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) says that pregnant women should be put on house arrest while fighting their deportation cases, rather than detained in prison-like facilities. After they told us repeatedly that they “don’t detain pregnant women” we found quite the contrary. Through serialized reporting, Fusion uncovered that nearly 600 pregnant detainees were held in detention centers in the last two years. Women that we spoke with said they were severely underfed and denied basic prenatal treatment. As the reporter and producer on the project, I, Cristina Costantini, uncovered that the agency even initially lied about a miscarriage that occurred in one detention center.
  • Using Jailed Migrants as a Pool of Cheap Labor

    The U.S. government is the nation's single largest employer of undocumented immigrants. This was the startling discovery of a 7-month investigation into a little-known program that allows the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency to employ these immigrants and pay them a $1 a day or less to perform most of the jobs running the 250 federal immigration detention centers around the country. This finding was even more striking considering the number of undocumented workers involved -- more than 60,000 per year -- and the amount of money the federal government saves and private prison companies make (at least $40 million annually) as a direct result of being allowed to pay these people so far below the minimum wage, or about 13 cents per hour.
  • Bound and Punished

    Arkansas law prohibits punishment of juvenile delinquents, requiring instead that child offenders be provided treatment, rehabilitation and safe environments. But at the Yell County Juvenile Detention Center, where hundreds of children have been sent for years, punishment was not only allowed, top administrators encouraged it. State officials responsible for assuring the safety and well-being of youth in county-run detention centers learned of this routine mistreatment only after the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette shared internal incident reports with them.
  • Corruption at Juvenile Prisons

    Chris Kirkham exposes the corruption at juvenile for-profit prisons, boot camps and detention centers. From condoning abuse of inmates to neglect to corruption we'll hear firsthand stories from those on the inside.
  • Prisoners of Profit

    HuffPost Business reporter Chris Kirkham exposes the corruption at juvenile for-profit prisons, boot camps and detention centers. From condoning abuse of inmates to neglect to corruption, Kirkham uncovers firsthand stories from those on the inside.
  • Waiting to React: Tennessee's child protection failures

    A lawmaker's concern about child deaths triggered a probing and ongoing Tennessean investigation into the failings and illegal practices of the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services. The newspaper detailed how the department broke the law by not reporting deaths to lawmakers; failed to keep accurate fatality statistics; allowed thousands of child abuse hotline calls to go unanswered; struggled to handle a spike in violence at youth detention centers; and adopted adversarial positions against child advocates, lawmakers, police and the agencies that oversee the department. Led by two reporters, the newspaper has exposed the department's $37 million computer installation debacle, shortcomings in how officials contract with private companies, and how a wave of abrupt senior-level firings made DCS one of the most volatile departments in Tennessee government. Through records requests, data analyses, close readings of reports and audits, and persistent questioning, The Tennessean penetrated the secretive $650 million department and provided a level of accountability just as the department has moved to dismantle other forms of oversight. The reporting prompted Gov. Bill Haslam to personally review DCS case files and forced the department to comply with fatality notification laws. An ongoing open records lawsuit led by The Tennessean and backed by the state's largest ever media coalition now seeks to force DCS to make child fatality records available to the media and the public for the first time.
  • Governor Quinn Keeping Juvenile Prisons in the Dark

    The report details governor Quinn's refusal to block information concerning conditions inside juvenile detention centers. The system cycles the same offenders in and out, and the report demonstrates why information on life inside these prisons could be beneficial to voters and taxpayers.
  • "Judgment Day"

    Two judges accepted $2.67 million in payoffs for sending juveniles to "two for-profit" detention centers. In this investigation, the reporter uncovers the identities of the lawyer and contractor who supplied the payments, and revealed the mob connections of one of the judges.