Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "elections" ...

  • APM Reports: Voter Suppression

    A handful of states are using someone's decision not to vote as the trigger for removing them from the rolls. The APM Reports analysis resulted in the first estimate of the so-called "use it or lose it" policy's possible impact. We found that no state has been more aggressive with this approach than Georgia, where Brian Kemp, as secretary of state, oversaw the purging of a growing number of voters ahead of his own run for governor, according to an APM Reports investigation. Voting rights advocates call it a new form of voter suppression, and they fear it will soon spread to other states.
  • 60 Minutes: Hacking Democracy

    During the 2016 presidential election, Russian operatives launched a widespread cyberattack against state voting systems around the country. While officials say no votes were changed on election day, America's election infrastructure remains vulnerable just seven months before the 2018 midterm elections.
  • Election Integrity: The Southern Vote Project

    In our groundbreaking, exclusive, “flood-the-zone” Southern Vote Project, WhoWhatWhy probed the state of election integrity and revealed deep problems, including widespread disenfranchisement of large segments of the voting public. Sending a full-time team to several southern states, we documented a broad range of factors, some seemingly intentional, that resulted in voter suppression or created cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Because we were uniquely focused on this topic, we started breaking stories that other outlets were unwilling or unable to pursue. Our work played an important role in compelling legacy news outlets to begin covering this issue. Our hard-hitting coverage also resulted in several lawsuits, which in turn brought about changes in how votes were counted through court decisions made in the heat of the elections.
  • How to Hack An Election

    The inside story of how a cybercriminal for hire teamed with Latin's America's most notorious fixer to influence presidential elections and subvert government power across the continent for a decade. Despite a wealth of cybersecurity reporting in recent years, the ability of computer hackers to disrupt the democratic foundation of elections had gone virtually unchronicled. This Bloomberg Businessweek article not only showed it could be done, it took the reader deep inside the operations with a hacker, who put himself in danger by speaking. The ground-breaking story stunned readers, journalists and officials in several countries. And it proved to be a roadmap to the disruption of the U.S. presidential election later in the year, with Russian agents accused of using digital tools to manipulate social media and to produce fake news that influenced public opinion.
  • City of Brighton enters new year with old investigation

    This story is a summary of months of reporting on an investigation into allegations of voter fraud. It presents never before heard comments from the local district attorney and Alabama Secretary of State. The district attorney announced an investigation on Aug. 19, 2016 after 80 applications for absentee ballots requested ballots be mailed to then-mayoral candidate Brandon Dean. Dean won the election with 52 percent of the vote, and 99 of 107 of the absentee ballots cast in his favor. The reporter's investigation shows that at least three absentee ballots cast were tired to vacant homes.
  • Public Corruption in Nassau County

    A federal investigation into New York State Senator Dean Skelos and his son’s job with a firm that had a contract with Nassau County raised the prospect that additional problems with the county contracting process had escaped federal attention. Newsday assigned four reporters to determine whether the expenditure of tax dollars had been corrupted, and over the course of the year, the newspaper published parallel investigations that have led to local and federal investigations, an impact on local elections and important questions about how the county’s top officials conduct public business.
  • Capitol Gains

    A unique in-depth investigation into South Carolina’s loophole-ridden campaign finance system where vague reporting requirements and lax oversight allow lawmakers to profit from public office and to use their campaign war chests like personal ATM machines.
  • Broken System, Missing Money?

    KOB's investigative team exposed a serious blind spot in New Mexico's campaign finance system. The system is supposed to give voters honest and accurate information about who is bankrolling political campaigns in the state, but KOB found a $300,000 discrepancy in records tied to 11 elected leaders alone. The findings prove that it's nearly impossible to accurately follow the political money trail in New Mexico with confidence. Numerous legislators are now calling for reform and have drafted proposals and legislation as a result of KOB’s reporting.
  • Politics in Cook County Schools

    In the April, 2015 Cook County elections, a number of local mayors, two state representatives and a township highway commissioner got actively involved in local school board elections. They paid for campaign mailers, palm cards and even robo-calls. When the Illinois State Board of Elections released campaign donation information for the second quarter of 2015, a web of cash and in-kind donations to local school board campaign committees was revealed. Three recurring donors showed up in the campaign contribution records for the politicians and school board committees. They are Del Galdo Law Group, Odelson & Sterk attorneys, and Franklin Park company Restore Construction.
  • Fixed Fortunes: Biggest corporate political interests spend billions, get trillions

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists?