Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "federal agency" ...

  • NPR/Frontline: Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • News4 I-Team: Injection Injuries

    This series examined the devastating effects of shoulder injuries from shots given incorrectly. We found those injuries now account for half of all the new cases in the federal Vaccine Injury Compensation Program- which was initially created to help victims injured by what's inside the syringe, not mistakes made by the shot-giver. We calculated that the federal agency which administers the program has quietly paid out $76 million for those injuries, without ever telling the shot-givers they did it incorrectly.
  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Nation’s Disabled Work Program Mired in Corruption, Fraud (Keeping Them Honest)

    The nation's premier federal program that provides work for people who are severely disabled is mired in widespread corruption, financial fraud and violations of the law, sources told CNN. And instead of helping the severely disabled find work, the taxpayer-funded agency is at times allowing jobs to betaken away from the disabled, the sources say. AbilityOne, along with the nonprofit agency that manages its program for the severely disabled, ourceAmerica, are being investigated by authorities for illegal operations, financial fraud, mismanagement, operating in violation of the law, steering of contracts, and possibly obstruction of justice. Several inside sources tell CNN the program is among the worst cases of its type they've ever seen in a federal agency, covering some $2.3 billion in taxpayer-funded contracts.
  • Just sign here: Federal workers max out at taxpayers' expense

    FMCS is a tiny independent federal agency whose director's first order of business was to use federal funds to buy artwork from his own wife, $200 coasters and champagne. The agency paid $85,000 to the phantom company of a just-retired official for no services; spent $50,000 at a jewelry store, supposedly on picture frames to give its 200 employees "tenure awards;" and leased its people $53,000 cars. Large portions of its employees routinely used government credit cards for clearly personal items after merely requesting to have them “unblocked” from restricted items, according to 50,000 pages of internal documents obtained by the Washington Examiner--raising questions about purchase card use in other agencies. Federal employees were charging cell phones for their whole families and cable TV at not just their homes, but their vacation homes too, to the government. Its IT director has had hundreds of thousands of dollars of high-end electronics delivered to his home in West Virginia, and there is no record of many of those items being tracked to federal offices. Many other items billed are highly suspect, such as $500 for single USB thumb drives that retail for $20. Virtually all of its spending circumvented federal procurement laws. When employees pointed out rulebreaking, Director George Cohen forced one accountant to write a letter to the GSA retracting her complaint, had another top employee walked out by armed guards, and fired another whistleblower, a disabled veteran, for missing a day of work while she laid in the ICU. At an agency the size of FMCS, where corruption went to the top, there were no higher levels to appeal to, no Inspector General, and--previously--no press attention.
  • Retirees' Disability Epidemic

    One of the nation's largest commuter lines, Long Island Rail Road, has taken advantage of an obscure federal agency to reap staggering paychecks once they leave their jobs.
  • "Destructive construction"

    A lawsuit involving the electrocution of a crane worker prompted this investigation that uncovered a loophole in the enforcement of safety laws. Texas law requires an electrical insulation device be used when cranes work near power lines. But because Texas relies on OSHA, a federal agency, to regulate and enforce workplace safety, the Texas law wasn't enforced. A spot check by reporters of numerous crane operators in the area showed they were not using the insulation device as required by law. The story prompted changes at OSHA and at the county level.
  • Hippie Healthcare Policy

    Torrey writes of the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), a federal agency that still exists largely on the notion that mental illnesses are a form of social control rather than medical care. This is especially interesting since so many other federal agencies take exactly the opposite stance.
  • Land Lords: How a Trio of Texans Turned S&L Debacle Into Personal Fortunes

    The Journals tells the story of Rene Campos, Adam Weis and Greg Smith, who were will to gamble with real estate property after Texas savings-and-loan crisis. The three bought properties from the Resolution Trust Company, "the federal agency created to clean up the mess," fixed them and started profiting from the cheap undervalued property. The profit did not come from speculative "flipping," but from clearing and managing the properties.
  • Deadly Driving: Safety Agency Puts Motorists at Risk

    In an eight-month investigation, The Detroit News examined the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and found "the federal agency created 35 years ago to make vehicles safer is failing consumers, leading to at least 3,100 deaths and 18,000 injuries each year." The agency also fails to find defects in cars and trucks and fails to force recalls for repairs.