Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "finance" ...

  • Fixed Fortunes

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists? Bill Allison and Sarah Harkins set out to answer that question, compiling huge amounts of data from multiple federal sources, identifying the biggest corporate political donors over a six year period, and then compiling numbers on the various federal support -- contracts, grants, loans, loan guarantees and various programs adopted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis -- to attempt to show what the biggest donors get from the federal government.
  • NAACP President / Phantom Nonprofit

    In late 2013, members of the Philadelphia NAACP began to question how that group’s finances had been handled by its president, Jerome Whyatt Mondesire. Eventually, more than twenty members of the group, including most of its executive committee, co-wrote a letter to Mondesire asking for answers to 22 questions about the group’s finances, especially why funds meant for the group appeared to have passed through another nonprofit organization, apparently run by Mondesire himself. AxisPhilly obtained that letter and, on January 21, 2014 first published it. An AxisPhilly investigation began to look into what the answers to them were. Over the course of 2014, they published six stories detailing the convoluted and troubling connections between the local NAACP branch’s finances and the Next Generation CDC, a separate (and legally-defunct) nonprofit controlled by NAACP president Jerome Whyatt Mondesire. That nonprofit, they discovered, had acquired property, donations, and hundreds of thousands of dollars in the name of the storied civil rights organization, apparently without the knowledge of its members and for uses that were not only unrelated to the storied civil rights group but appear to have been made up or which benefited Mondesire personally.
  • Los Nuevos Narcotesoros

    Univision News’ Investigative Unit, presents an in-depth report on the devastating consequences of illegal mining by organized crime in Latin America, taking viewers inside a criminal world where mafias that formerly only trafficked drugs are now exploiting the mineral resources of Mexico, Colombia and Peru to finance their operations and expand their power. Taking its cameras from the Mexican states of Michoacán and Guerrero to different regions of Colombia and the Peruvian Amazon, “Nuevos Narcotesoros” delivers a compelling account of how violent criminal organizations are taking over the extraction of gold and iron ore and victimizing entire communities by extorting, torturing and killing miners who do not conform to their demands, as well as gaining control of local governments through violence and bribery.
  • The Rise and Fall of a Patrón

    Our investigation showed how powerful political alliances helped United Neighborhood Organization (UNO) grow from a community group into a multimillion-dollar enterprise operating 16 taxpayer-funded charter schools, a janitorial firm and other businesses. We found a lack of oversight of charter school finances and operations cleared the way for alleged abuse. Specifically: UNO received more than $280 million in public money over the past five years but neither Chicago Public Schools nor the Illinois State Board of Education closely monitored how funds were spent. A large portion of the public money UNO collects goes to management fees, debt service and consultants rather than classrooms.
  • Police Informants

    The NYPD released, for the first time, data about how much it pays police informants and for what sorts of crimes. The original public records request and appeal was outright rejected by the NYPD and the writer was unable to finance a court action as a freelancer, so she applied for legal assistance via a pro bono clearinghouse operated by the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. The media law firm Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz agreed to take up the case and filed a lawsuit against the NYPD on her behalf, resulting in an out-of-court settlement for the data she sought, more than two years after filing her original records request.
  • Building debt: $2 billion in bonds approved in districts formed by developers

    The story is about a series of obscure government agencies that are quietly building up more than $2 billion in debt in Denton County, Texas. The county ranks fifth among Texas counties with 62 and first in North Texas of the little-known special water districts, a type of government entity used by developers to finance infrastructure for residential and commercial developments. The story reveals how the districts debt and numbers proliferated after the state decided to halt related investigation and they deemed the investigations a waste of government resources.
  • UNO: For insiders, charter schools pay

    This investigation exposed millions of dollars in insider deals made by a major operator of taxpayer-financed, privately run charter schools in Chicago. It prompted: the freezing of state funding; the ouster of the organization's top two officials; two state investigations; and one federal investigation.
  • The Birdsall Files

    Star-Ledger reporter Christopher Baxter left no stone unturned last year in telling how one of New Jersey’s most prolific and politically influential engineering firms greased the palms of politicians throughout New Jersey to win millions of dollars in public contracts.
  • Investigation of Congressman Steve Stockman

    A Houston Chronicle investigation in recent months revealed that a United States congressman has been managing his campaign finances with impunity for years without any serious punishment.
  • A Department in Disarray

    In 2013 the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette exposed numerous systemic problems in the city of Pittsburgh's 900-member police department, focusing on a lack of oversight over its personnel and finances.