Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "finances" ...

  • The Politics of Big Telecom

    The largest U.S. telecommunications companies have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on lobbying, political contributions and influence campaigns that shape laws and regulations that will have long-lasting effects on how American businesses and citizens will pay for and get the online information they need to manage their everyday lives. For "The Politics of Big Telecom," the Center for Public Integrity combed through large databases of campaign finances, tax filings and regulatory reports, and interviewed dozens of people from top government officials to average people on the street to show how large telecommunications companies shape public policy to defend profits, hold on to market power and reduce choices for the public.
  • City Savings Over Police Safety - How The Ford Crown Vic Still Haunts Fort Worth

    The call came in on police scanners as an accident - Two cars, one was on fire and a major highway may need to be shut down. Turns out, after witness and chopper video was secured, our station had confirmed the car on fire was a police patrol car; but not just any patrol car, a Ford Crown Victoria. Yes, THE Ford Crown Vic. The scene was, unfortunately, a familiar one for the City of Fort Worth. During the height of the Ford Crown Vic revolt, Fort Worth Police lost one of its own officers. He was responding to a late-night DWI call when he was hit from behind. He was trapped in his car and burned to death in his Ford Crown Vic. More than seven years later, it felt like history was repeating itself. But why? The city had promised they'd make things right by making sure no other officer was ever put in that position again. The CBS 11 I-Team dug through years of records to find that wasn't true. That in fact, the City of Fort Worth had chosen saving money or police safety.
  • NAACP President / Phantom Nonprofit

    In late 2013, members of the Philadelphia NAACP began to question how that group’s finances had been handled by its president, Jerome Whyatt Mondesire. Eventually, more than twenty members of the group, including most of its executive committee, co-wrote a letter to Mondesire asking for answers to 22 questions about the group’s finances, especially why funds meant for the group appeared to have passed through another nonprofit organization, apparently run by Mondesire himself. AxisPhilly obtained that letter and, on January 21, 2014 first published it. An AxisPhilly investigation began to look into what the answers to them were. Over the course of 2014, they published six stories detailing the convoluted and troubling connections between the local NAACP branch’s finances and the Next Generation CDC, a separate (and legally-defunct) nonprofit controlled by NAACP president Jerome Whyatt Mondesire. That nonprofit, they discovered, had acquired property, donations, and hundreds of thousands of dollars in the name of the storied civil rights organization, apparently without the knowledge of its members and for uses that were not only unrelated to the storied civil rights group but appear to have been made up or which benefited Mondesire personally.
  • The Rise and Fall of a Patrón

    Our investigation showed how powerful political alliances helped United Neighborhood Organization (UNO) grow from a community group into a multimillion-dollar enterprise operating 16 taxpayer-funded charter schools, a janitorial firm and other businesses. We found a lack of oversight of charter school finances and operations cleared the way for alleged abuse. Specifically: UNO received more than $280 million in public money over the past five years but neither Chicago Public Schools nor the Illinois State Board of Education closely monitored how funds were spent. A large portion of the public money UNO collects goes to management fees, debt service and consultants rather than classrooms.
  • Investigation of Congressman Steve Stockman

    A Houston Chronicle investigation in recent months revealed that a United States congressman has been managing his campaign finances with impunity for years without any serious punishment.
  • A Department in Disarray

    In 2013 the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette exposed numerous systemic problems in the city of Pittsburgh's 900-member police department, focusing on a lack of oversight over its personnel and finances.
  • A Rush of Financial Questions

    The Better Government Association (BGA) spent eight months researching the finances of U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush (D-Ill), his campaign committees, and nonprofits he founded or otherwise is affiliated with. Our findings, published with the Chicago Sun-Times in a two-part series, paint a troubling portrait of Rush, and question whose interests he’s really serving in Congress.
  • For The Record: Unrestricted Warfare

    For The Record investigated whether the 2008 U.S. financial crisis may have been caused at least in part by economic terrorism – the intentional infliction of economic damage on U.S. markets. The theory was investigated by a report commissioned by the Pentagon, which the Defense Department later sought to marginalize. For The Record spoke with former high-level Pentagon officials who said that the report was quashed because it didn’t “fit the narrative” being pushed at the time.
  • Governor'Security Detail Overtime Tops $1 Million

    A six-month long investigation reveals that, despite campaigning on promises of cutting overtime costs for state employees, Governor Dannel Malloy own security team has racked up more than $1.1 million dollars in overtime in his first two years in office. That is more than the combined overtime costs for the security details of both the previous governor and lieutenant governor. Much of the overtime comes from Governor Malloy's extensive national and international travel, something critics deride as Malloy's bid for national exposure. A follow-up story found costs for the Governor's highly criticized trip to the White House Correspondents' Dinner cost $4800, despite the administration's previous claims that there was no taxpayer expense involved in the trip. Since the stories aired, the trip costs and overtime expenses for Malloy's security detail have become a campaign issue.
  • Predators

    A business reporter reveals remarkably common but overlooked financial chicanery that harms millions of vulnerable Americans, particularly the elderly and the poor.