Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "food" ...

  • Cock Fight: One Man’s Battle Against The Chicken Industry

    Chicken is by far the most popular meat in the United States. Every year, 9 billion are slaughtered for food. But very little is actually known about how they are grown, raised and killed. Indications are that the U.S. chicken industry, which is controlled by four major companies, would prefer to keep it that way. It’s not easy to get a camera into the sheds where industrial poultry is raised, known as a “broiler farm.” But Craig Watts, a third generation farmer from North Carolina, was willing to give the Fusion Investigates team unprecedented access to his operation, where he churns out roughly 120,000 birds every two months. http://interactive.fusion.net/cock-fight/
  • Nu-World Foods Investigation

    CBS 2's investigation into Nu-World Foods.
  • The Trouble with Chicken

    FRONTLINE investigates the spread of dangerous pathogens in our meat -- particularly poultry -- and why the food-safety system isn't stopping the threat. Focusing on an outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg at one of the nation's largest poultry processors, the documentary reveals how contaminants are evading regulators and causing more severe illnesses at a time when Americans are consuming more chicken than ever. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/trouble-with-chicken/transcript/
  • What's in Your Food?

    This special report featured 12 pieces of content including two investigative reports, an infographic, two videos, two expert Q&As, four supporting stories and a quiz. It has been WebMDs most successful (in terms of viewership) independent special report to date. http://www.webmd.com/news/breaking-news/food-additives/food-additives-infographic
  • Hattiesburg taxpayers fund liquor, jewelry, and gifts

    WDAM uncovered misspending of taxpayer dollars at the Hattiesburg Tourism Commission. In summary, the city imposes an extra two percent tax on restaurant food purchases in the city to help fund tourism in the area. That money was instead spent on luxury items such as Tiffany jewelry and family vacations by the executive director and several people working for him. https://vimeo.com/151837779 http://www.wdam.com/story/28416053/investigation-hattiesburg-taxpayers-fund-liquor-jewelry-and-gifts
  • Devastating Virus

    Most people think food comes from the grocery store. So when a devastating virus hit the hog industry in Spring 2013, few people probably noticed except when it came to paying a lot more for bacon that summer. At Harvest Public Media, a public radio collaboration based in the Midwest, we know that food production is an expensive, complicated process. We investigated Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus, a fast-spreading virus never before seen in the U.S., finding an intriguing international story and a significant failure by the U.S. agency that oversees agriculture.
  • Drug Problems: Dangerous Decision-Making at the FDA

    The public depends on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ensure that medicines are safe and effective, but through many months and almost 30,000 words of reporting, POGO’s ongoing “Drug Problems” investigation has revealed dangerously lax FDA oversight of prescription drugs. We found that the FDA has set low standards, approved drugs based on flawed clinical trials, taken a toothless approach toward doctors who violate standards of clinical research, allowed misleading marketing, provided inadequate warnings about drug hazards, slighted reports of drug-related deaths and injuries, withheld important information from the public, and made other dubious judgments that advanced the interests of pharmaceutical companies while putting patients at potentially deadly risk. Among other developments detailed in our package: After we exposed a potentially crippling flaw in the testing of a blockbuster drug, the FDA and its European counterpart said they were reexamining the clinical trial upon which they had based the drug’s approval.
  • Seafood From Slaves

    The Associated Press team uncovered a slave island and relentlessly exposed horrific labor abuses in Thailand's $7 billion annual seafood export industry. During their year-long investigation, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, Martha Mendoza and Esther Htusan tied seafood caught and processed by trapped workers to the supply chains of almost every major U.S. retailer including Wal-Mart, Kroger, Sysco and Nestle. The reporters used images from space to track down runaway slave ships in Papua New Guinea and dug up loopholes in federal law allowing imports to continue unchecked. When Thailand¹s government said the abuses all occur in foreign territory, the journalists focused on factories just outside its capital, Bangkok where they found children and poor migrants locked inside and forced to peel shrimp. Tapping AP colleagues in all 50 states and eight countries, they documented how those seafood supply chains spread around the world. http://interactives.ap.org/2015/seafood-from-slaves/?START=freedom https://vimeo.com/151181618 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IeJOnCQlj0&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgYgAVQG5lk&feature=youtu.be
  • A Game of Chicken

    Over the course of a decade, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had not one, not two, not three, but four opportunities to warn the public about salmonella outbreaks involving Foster Farms chicken. Each time, they hemmed and hawed, worrying more about the threat of legal action from a corporate giant than about protecting consumers. Health reporter Lynne Terry was the first journalist in America to identify and write about this alarming trend. With reporters from Frontline, The Center for Investigative Reporting and the New York Times circling around the story, she beat them all with a stunning and illuminating examination of the failures of the USDA. In her year-long investigation, Terry set out to determine if the USDA’s notoriously slow handling of a major salmonella outbreak in 2013-2014 was an isolated case. It wasn’t. She reviewed thousands of pages of previously undisclosed documents dating back to 2003. What she found was disturbing: More than 1,000 people had rushed to their doctors with bouts of food poisoning. They had no idea what made them sick. But federal regulators did. Those same federal officials took virtually no steps to protect consumers from bad chicken. Health officials in Oregon and Washington had pushed vigorously for federal action, having identified clear and convincing evidence of problems. But the USDA wouldn’t budge. Terry’s meticulous reporting identified these themes: •USDA officials are afraid of lawsuits. The agency is so worried about being sued by companies that they’ve set an almost impossible bar for evidence, even rejecting samples of tainted chicken that state health agencies believed would help clinch their case. •Government inspectors are pressured to go easy on food processors. In one notable case, the USDA transferred an inspector after Foster Farms complained he wrote too many citations. •The USDA succumbed to further pressure from Foster Farms. After strong pushback from the company’s lawyers, the agency backed away from citing an unequivocal connection linking the company to a 2004 outbreak – even though the evidence pointed only to Foster Farms.
  • Nuclear Radiation and Food Safety

    Although the agricultural products from regions near Fukushima, Japan are still tainted by radiation, the South Korean government is looking to resume imports, adding to the fear of radiation exposure among Korean citizens, Rumors are rife on the internet, amplifying the atmosphere of terror. Our team carried out a full investigation of the actual situation in Japan to help address the widespread fear. The real radiation levels of agricultural products from the 8 prefectures near Fukushima were tested and revealed. The message of the program was that the import decisions of the Korean government has to give top priority public food security