Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "food" ...

  • Colgate Total Ingredient Linked to Hormones, Cancer Spotlights FDA Process

    Kary exposed health risks posed by antibacterial chemical triclosan in Colgate Total toothpaste, in part by examining pages of Colgate-Palmolive's Food and Drug Administration application that were kept private after the toothpaste's 1997 approval. These previously undisclosed pages, summaries of scientific studies Colgate submitted as part of its new-drug application, contained indications of a potential health danger in one of America's top-selling toothpastes, according to scientists who reviewed them for Bloomberg News. Kary's article raises important questions, including whether the FDA did appropriate due diligence in approving Total 17 years ago, and whether its approval should stand in light of new research. By combining tough and fair investigative reporting, clear science writing and an examination of America's regulatory system, Kary's piece gave readers a valuable new tool for decision-making on an important health and wellness front.
  • American Catch

    In American Catch, award-winning author Paul Greenberg takes the same skills that won him acclaim in Four Fish to uncover the tragic unraveling of the nation’s seafood supply—telling the surprising story of why Americans stopped eating from their own waters. In 2005, the United States imported five billion pounds of seafood, nearly double what we imported twenty years earlier. Bizarrely, during that same period, our seafood exports quadrupled. American Catch examines New York oysters, Gulf shrimp, and Alaskan salmon to reveal how it came to be that 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat is foreign. Despite the challenges, hope abounds. In New York, Greenberg connects an oyster restoration project with a vision for how the bivalves might save the city from rising tides. In the Gulf, shrimpers band together to offer local catch direct to consumers. And in Bristol Bay, fishermen, environmentalists, and local Alaskans gather to roadblock Pebble Mine. With American Catch, Paul Greenberg proposes a way to break the current destructive patterns of consumption and return American catch back to American eaters.
  • The Politics of Poison

    Arsenic is consumed by people in small amounts in the food we eat and the water we drink. EPA scientists concluded that if 100,000 women consumed the legal limit of arsenic each day 730 of them eventually would get lung or bladder cancer. The investigation found that a single paragraph inserted into a committee report by a member of Congress essentially ordered the EPA to halt its investigation of arsenic, or make public its arsenic findings, an action that could trigger stricter drinking water standards. A lobbyist for two pesticide companies acknowledged that he was among those who asked for the delay. As a direct result of the delay a week killer the EPA was going to ban at the end of 2013 remains on the market.
  • The Dark Side of the Strawberry

    California strawberry growers are hooked on a dangerous class of pesticides and, along with chemical companies, have exploited loopholes in local regulations and global treaties to keep using these chemicals, increasing cancer risk in more than 100 California communities and further depleting the ozone layer in the process. The Center for Investigative Reporting, also published online by The Guardian U.S.
  • Rape in the Fields/ Violación de un Sueño

    Rape in the Fields/Violación de un Sueño is an unprecedented broadcast partnership between FRONTLINE and Univision Documentaries (Documentales Univision), which joined forces to bring this powerful and underreported story to a broad, diverse and multi-lingual audience. Winner of the 2013 Dupont-Columbia Silver Baton, the film was broadcast on two national networks, in two languages reaching millions of viewers. Led by Correspondent Lowell Bergman, the project was a yearlong effort by the Investigative Reporting Program at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and the Center for Investigative Reporting. It shed light on pervasive sexual assault against the immigrant women who pick and handle the food we eat every day.
  • New egg safety plan shows cracks in the system

    It’s been almost three years since more than 500 million eggs were recalled in 2010 because of an outbreak of Salmonella that caused nearly 2,000 illnesses - the largest outbreak of its kind on record. Yet under a new egg safety plan approved shortly before the recall, all egg production facilities are still not inspected as required by the plan.
  • Who’s the Grossest Grocer in New York?

    In our “Grossest Grocer” series, Patch journalists uncovered dozens of grocery stores that could sicken the communities we serve, and made a vast database of state records available to the wider public for the first time. To find New York supermarkets with a history of food safety problems and tell their stories, we exclusively obtained a state database of inspection records through a Freedom of Information Law request and protracted negotiation with the state. Our editors spent months analyzing millions of violations observed by state inspectors, conferring with experts, and verifying our finds with on-the-ground reporting. We published more than 70 articles in this series, and an interactive map with detailed data on all of New York’s retail food stores -- more than 33,000 businesses, from corner bodegas to major grocery chains.
  • Left to Their Own Devices

    Medical devices are crucial for the wellbeing of many Americans. They can be as life-sustaining as cardiac pacemakers or as simple as wooden tongue depressors. Regardless of their complexity, all medical devices must go through a clearance process by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before they are cleared for market. While the vast majority of these devices are safe and effective, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), hundreds are recalled every year. And the impact of an unsafe medical device can be devastating.
  • Can You Fight Poverty With A Five-Star Hotel?

    My story is about the World Bank’s private investing arm, the International Finance Corporation, the IFC. It reveals that the IFC is a profit-oriented, deal-driven organization that not only fails to fight poverty, its stated mission, but may exacerbate it in its zeal to earn a healthy return on investment. The article details my investigation through hundreds of primary source and other documents, dozens of interviews around the world and my trip to Ghana to see many projects first-hand, to recount that the IFC hands out billions in cut-rate loans to wealthy tycoons and giant multinationals in some of the world’s poorest places. My story details the IFC’s investments with a who’s who of giant multinational corporations: Dow Chemical, DuPont, Mitsubishi, Vodafone, and many more. It outlines that the IFC funds fast-food chains like Domino's Pizza in South Africa and Kentucky Fried Chicken in Jamaica. It invests in upscale shopping malls in Egypt, Ghana, the former Soviet republics, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia. It backs candy-shop chains in Argentina and Bangladesh; breweries with global beer behemoths like SABMiller and with other breweries in the Czech Republic, Laos, Romania, Russia, and Tanzania; and soft-drink distribution for the likes of Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and their competitors in Cambodia, Ethiopia, Mali, Russia, South Sudan, Uzbekistan, and more. The criticism of most such investments -- from a broad array of academics, watchdog groups and local organizations in the poor countries themselves -- is that these investments make little impact on poverty and could just as easily be undertaken without IFC subsidies. In some cases, critics contend, the projects hold back development and exacerbate poverty, not to mention subjecting affected countries to pollution and other ills.
  • Sysco’s Dirty Secret: Outdoor Food Sheds Across U.S. and Canada

    After receiving a tip that seemed too wild to be true, we began weeks of surveillance and hidden camera recordings to expose the hidden food practices of the world’s largest food distributor. As a result of our reporting, the company publicly vowed to make sweeping changes to ensure the safety of its food delivery to millions of people across North America. Our reports also prompted investigations by state, federal and Canadian health officials that are ongoing and are expected to result in significant monetary penalties.