Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "foster children" ...

  • Pain & Profit

    Pain & Profit revealed the terrible consequences of Texas officials' decision to turn over medical care for the state's sickest and most vulnerable citizens to for-profit health care companies. Foster children were denied critical nursing, disabled adults suffered without adequate treatment, and severely sick children lost access to their doctors -- all while companies received billions of dollars of taxpayer money. The state failed to oversee the corporations it hired; when it was told of problems, it covered them up. Our investigation into what's know as Medicaid managed care, which highlights a national problem, has already led to major changes in Texas.
  • 12 News I-Team: Children At Risk

    12 News worked tirelessly to defend the public interest in an exclusive investigation, ’12 News- I-Team: Children At Risk’ which exposed a pattern of abuse affecting some of the most vulnerable members of our community, defenseless foster children. Through filing records requests, following up on anonymous tips, combing through legal documents, and mining dozens of sources, investigative reporter Bianca Buono uncovered the unthinkable: the Department of Child Services placed a six-year-old foster child directly into the home of a level three convicted sex offender.
  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.
  • Lives on the Line

    Reporter Doug Donovan uncovered inadequate care and state oversight of group homes that care for the most vulnerable of citizens: disabled foster children. His investigation revealed that state contractor Lifeline Inc. had numerous problems that were unknown to regulators. After his initial story the state moved the children to another group home. However, Donovan revealed issues with the new provider, including employees who were dismissed for mistreating patients and who lacked specialized training.
  • Prescription Kids

    Foster children in Colorado are prescribed psychotropic drugs, including powerful anti-psychotics with harmful side effects, at five times the rate of other kids.
  • Innocents Lost

    The Herald explored how 477 children died of abuse or neglect over a six-year period after falling through Florida’s child welfare safety net, largely as a result of a misguided effort to reduce the number of foster children while simultaneously slashing services for troubled families. We have since continued the reporting into a seventh year and the number of dead is our searchable database is now 533..
  • Failure to Protect

    The two-day series “A Failure to Protect” examined what went wrong in the case of a Central Minnesota family that grew to 26 through a mix of biological, adopted and foster children, but eventually was torn apart by sexual abuse charges. Reporters David Unze and Kirsti Marohn uncovered how Minnesota’s child protection system allows either counties or nonprofits to license foster homes with little oversight.
  • Down the Hatch

    The story investigates whether a powerful drug manufacturing company lied to push an antipsychotic on foster children.
  • Forced to Fight

    The original story documents how a remote facility for foster children with developmental disabilities forced to fight each other for the staff's entertainment, then rewarded the winners with snacks. The subsequent stories exposed a history of abuse and neglect at the facility.
  • Potent Pills: Foster Children and Mood Altering drugs

    "While Monroe Country NY has a foster care medical clinic that is considered a national model, our research showed an alarming increase in the prescription of psychotropic medications to foster children in the county."