Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "guns" ...

  • WRAL: Presumption of Fear

    An examination of North Carolina's castle doctrine law and how it was used, or misused, to keep a rural minister from being charged in the shooting death of his son-in-law.
  • WAMU 88.5: "Collateral Damage"

    The WAMU 88.5 series “Collateral Damage” chronicled the impact in human terms of the Washington, D.C., police department’s aggressive focus on confiscating illegal guns. The investigation explored how tactics used by police to search for guns are angering and alienating the very residents they are sworn to protect, especially in D.C.’s predominantly black neighborhoods where police focus these efforts.
  • The Trace: NRA Lobbyist Marion Hammer

    In this investigative profile, Mike Spies exposes how the NRA’s most powerful lobbyist turned Florida into a lab for the nation’s most aggressive gun laws.
  • Role of Obama-era school discipline policies in Parkland massacre

    Most news media neglected a huge part of the Parkland school massacre. They did so by focusing largely on the roles played by gun laws and mental illness in Nikolas Cruz’s rampage. Paul Sperry went against the grain, in a series of reports for RealClearInvestigations that exposed a central factor in the horror: an Obama-era push that made school discipline more lenient across the country because of concerns that minority students, especially African-Americans, were being disciplined at much higher rates than other Americans. Sperry was the first to report, and to comprehensively detail, this broad and ultimately misguided effort to end the “school to prison pipeline.”
  • RMPBS "Insight with John Ferrugia" - "Imminent Danger"

    This project examines the issue of killings by mentally ill persons with access to guns. The story is told through the eyes of a mother whose mentally ill son murdered a sheriff’s deputy and wounded four others, and of the Sheriff whose deputy died. Both agree the confrontation could have been avoided if only state law allowed earlier intervention when a mentally ill person with access to guns is spinning out of control. Both did everything possible to head off the crisis, but had no legal tools to prevent it. The project also includes an exclusive interview with the parents of Aurora Theater killer James Holmes who explain they simply did not recognize the warning signs that their son was mentally ill and capable of homicide. They hold themselves responsible for their son’s mass murder.
  • Kaiser Health News: Unlocked and Loaded: Families Confront Guns and Dementia

    In the U.S., where gun violence kills 96 people each day, there has been vigorous debate about how to stop the carnage, including ways to prevent people with mental illness from acquiring and owning firearms. But an unacknowledged and potentially far bigger problem is what to do about the vast cache of firearms in the homes of aging Americans with dementia. Our four-month investigation, produced in partnership with PBS Newshour, shed new light on an aspect of guns and public health that no one talks about, even though it may affect millions of Americans.
  • Investigating Gun Tracing

    Investigative Units from NBC Bay Area and NBC10 Philadelphia combined forces to uncover flaws in the way federal, state and local agents trace firearms through a technology meant to connect crimes through ballistics testing. While the technology is promising the team discovered, for the first time, that political infighting and sometimes simple bureaucratic inertia prevented the technology from even being consistently used, leaving some communities vulnerable to gun violence that could otherwise have been prevented.
  • Getting Guns Out of Dangerous Hands

    KING 5's reporting led to a new law in Washington state and a new task force targeting people who are prohibited from owning guns. The stories focused on gun laws that are supposed to keep firearms out of the hands of two classes of dangerous people: Those with criminal records, and those accused of domestic violence. Two separate series of investigative reports revealed that those laws were not enforced by the criminal justice system, and victims were paying for that with their lives.
  • Direkt36: Russian arms dealers

    Two Russian arms dealers operating in Hungary, Vladimir Lyubishin Sr. and Jr., were apprehended as a result of a U.S. DEA sting operation in late 2016. The Lyubishins wanted to supply a Mexican drug cartel with weapons to protect shipments of cocaine against US authorities and rival gangs. In reality, the Russians were negotiating with paid DEA informants. After the arrests, however, the Lyubishins managed to escape US justice thanks to Hungary’s Kremlin-friendly government as Hungary denied Washington’s request for extradition and sent the two arms dealers to Moscow instead. The operation as well as the extradition scandal was kept secret and was first revealed by my story.
  • Detroit Free Press: They look like cops, but they're not

    A Detroit Free Press investigation found that police agencies across Michigan are supplementing their ranks with unlicensed civilians, commonly called reserve officers, who wear uniforms and badges and carry guns. But these volunteers are unregulated and not subject to state-established training standards, despite frequently assisting real cops on patrol and, sometimes, with arrests. No one had ever tallied the number of reserve officers in Michigan, so the Free Press did and uncovered a staggering number, and many who had committed crimes and other misdeeds.