Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "health care" ...

  • inewsource: Hustling Hope

    inewsource spent months investigating how a California lawyer built a national network of Trina Health clinics to perform what he calls a “miraculous” treatment for reversing the complications of diabetes, even though medical experts consider it a scam that harms patients. Senior healthcare reporter Cheryl Clark tells the story of a couple in rural Montana who invested their life savings into opening their own clinic, in part so the husband could get the treatments locally for his diabetes. Less than two years later, the clinic was shuttered as health insurers refused to pay for the treatment and its founder came under federal investigation. He pleaded guilty in January 2019 to public corruption charges related to his Trina Health operation in Alabama.
  • ICIJ_NBC_AP_Partners: Implant Files

    Implant Files, the largest-ever collaborative health care investigation, sparked reforms by U.S. authorities by exposing the dark side of a global industry that pressures regulators to speed approvals, lower safety standards and cloak information, resulting in a string of grisly accidents that have left hundreds of thousands of patients disfigured, disabled or dead.
  • CT Mirror: Inmate Health Care

    CT Mirror began looking into the multi-million contract to provide inmate health care after a female prisoner gave birth in her cell last year. It quickly became apparent the state was not providing adequate oversight of the care being provided to inmates at a time when state funding had been drastically reduced.
  • VA nursing home quality revealed

    A rolling, joint investigation of Department of Veterans Affairs nursing home quality that pressured the agency to release internal ratings and data the agency had kept secret for years, depriving veterans and their families of potentially crucial health care information.
  • Heartbroken

    Heart surgery patients at the prestigious Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg died at a stunning rate, despite warnings that the procedures were putting kids at risk.
  • Bled Dry

    When local hospitals shut their doors, communities usually blame poor economics or heavy regulation. But The Dallas Morning News found another reason for closures: Businessmen who bought ailing hospitals and siphoned off their cash, often leaving them vacant hulks in devastated towns. What may seem at first to be an unlikely scenario has played out not just in Texas, but across the country. One owner left a trail of 13 wrecked hospitals in seven states. In Nevada, a doctor who put down $10,000 to take over the only hospital between Reno and Las Vegas pulled out at least $8 million before the cash-starved medical center shut down. Federal regulators and most states don’t vet people who take over hospitals, The News discovered, and there is little financial oversight. Even when patient care suffers at these stripped facilities, regulators seldom hold those who profited accountable.
  • Discharging Trouble

    The student reporters, working over a span of five months, found cases of elderly and disabled people who were discharged from a Maryland nursing home chain due to alleged financial concerns into unlicensed group or assisted living homes. Two people were assaulted in these homes. Attorneys and advocates for the poor said these were examples of a long-standing problem happening within the nursing care system in Maryland. These issues involve a combination of poor health circumstances, payment troubles, financial incentives to discharge patients and an unregulated underworld of group homes and unlicensed assisted-living facilities.
  • The Desperate and the Dead

    The Globe Spotlight Team documented tragic failings of the Massachusetts mental health care system, revealing for the first time that more than 10 percent of all homicides in the state are committed by people with a serious, treatable mental illness, and that nearly 50 percent of those fatally shot by police are suicidal, mentally ill, or showing clear signs of a mental health crisis. https://apps.bostonglobe.com/spotlight/the-desperate-and-the-dead/
  • How Urgent Is ‘Urgent’ Healthcare? As walk-in urgent care centers spread, so do questions about their expertise. One thing for sure: They’re not emergency rooms.

    More and more medical practices across the country are rebranding themselves as urgent care centers. Their proliferation is skyrocketing, almost unheard of two decades ago. They sound like places promising the kind of medical attention offered at emergency rooms. But they don’t. They are unregulated in New York and most other states; in New York, they are combating any effort at more oversight. For patients who go expecting emergency room-like care, there are concerns. There can result is delay in needed care, lack of equipment to do vital tests, and even fatal results. There is also a dark economic underbelly harming hospitals that actually do emergency work.
  • Unequal Risk

    The Center for Public Integrity’s “Unequal Risk” series highlights a long-neglected public health crisis: The deaths of some 50,000 people a year from work-related illnesses and the shamefully weak regulations governing toxic exposures on the job. Academics and advocates are pointing to our work to call attention to this grossly overlooked problem.