Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "health care" ...

  • Quarantining Lawsuits

    This report revealed how the two major health care systems in Roanoke concealed wrongful death lawsuits against them, after they agreed to settle the claims of medical malpractice. To do this, the hospitals had the lawsuits dropped quietly in the court where they were filed. They then went to out-of-town courthouses to settle the cases, largely out of public view.
  • Doctors in Georgia

    The citizens of Georgia are largely dependent on the state's medical board to protect them from incompetent or unscrupulous. These stories revealed that the board has failed to carry out that mission - by licensing doctors that other states considered untouchable, leaving patients in the dark about key issues such as the true nature of disciplinary actions and funneling some of the worst physicians into the state prison system.
  • DNAinfo.com New York

    DNAinfo New York reporters Rosa Goldensohn and James Fanelli investigated the private company contracted by New York City to provide health care for inmates in city jails. They uncovered poor medical treatment that led to inmate deaths.
  • Lawmaker, lobbyist brother stymie oral chemotherapy bill

    The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel discovered that leaders in the Wisconsin Legislature were using a parliamentary trick — a phantom public hearing that was never actually held — to block a vote on an overwhelmingly popular and bipartisan bill aimed at helping cancer patients afford ruinously expensive chemotherapy medications. The articles showed that leaders were not telling the truth when they said they were blocking the bill because the members of their caucuses didn’t support it.
  • Fear at FSU

    These stories exposed the utter failure of a state’s mental health system to aid a sick man who was in crisis and begging for help -- and showed that the cost of that failure was a shooting spree at a major American university. They raised questions about the handling of the shooter's case in New Mexico, stoked a national conversation about the availability of quality mental health care for people in need and spurred a proposal to reform New Mexico state law.
  • All of a sudden there was fire

    This article reports that adoption of precautionary measures to prevent patients from being set on fire in operating rooms across the country has been slow, often implemented only after hospitals experience an accident. Advocates say it’s not clear how many hospitals have instituted the available protocols, and no national safety authority tracks the frequency of surgical fires, which are thought to injure patients in one of every three incidents. About 240 surgical fires occur every year, according to rough estimates. But fires may be underreported because of fear of litigation or bad publicity.
  • Cell of squalor, weeks of despair

    A Harris County jail inmate, jailed on a marijuana charge while on probation and in need of mental health care, was left in his cell for weeks without being let out, living amid heaps of trash, swarms of bugs, and piles of his own feces. When inspectors with a jail compliance team entered the cell of inmate Terry Goodwin on October 10, 2013, he was wearing a filthy, shredded jail uniform in the fetid cell. Shards of his orange uniform were hanging from the ceiling light. His sink, toilet and shower drain were clogged, not just with feces, but with toilet paper in an apparent attempt by Goodwin to cover his own waste and with orange rinds, perhaps in futile effort to mask the smell. That’s when the cover-up began.
  • The Cost of Troubled Minds

    The Cost of Troubled Minds uncovers a crisis involving the treatment of the mentally ill in Texas. Investigative reporter Andy Pierrotti traveled thousands of miles across Texas and neighboring states to conduct interviews, speak to experts and review government documents. The investigation shows the state’s lack of resources, outdated facilities and a shortage of mental health care professionals ultimately cost taxpayers millions of dollars. The stories show how the problem puts a vulnerable population at risk, as told through the people and families impacted by untreated mental illness. A week following the investigation, a state report confirmed our findings and recommended overhauling the agency responsible for treating the mentally ill. In response to our investigations, a state senator filed legislation to help address shortages of mental health professionals in Texas.
  • Investigation of a Community Health Center

    With an infusion of $11 billion, the 1,300 community health centers across the U.S. have been hailed as the backbone of the Affordable Care Act’s plan to leave no one without health care. That’s a lot of money to accomplish a lot of good. It’s also a lot of money to tempt those with larcenous intent. Two years ago, Alabama Media Group discovered that two community health centers -- Birmingham Health Care and Central Alabama Comprehensive Health -- had paid more than $2 million for contracts to companies owned by the centers’ CEO. Now there are indictments and allegations of $14 million in federal funds being diverted to private hands.
  • UNTREATED: How Ignoring Mental Illness Costs Us All

    This devastating Rocky Mountain PBS I-News series examined the state of behavioral health care in Colorado. The costs of untreated mental illnesses in the state run into the billions of dollar each year, factoring in emergency medical expenses, lost wages, disability payments, and the price of housing the mentally ill in county jails and state prisons, among other quantifiable numbers. As big as the financial burdens of untreated mental illness are, the personal costs are greater. In Colorado, people with mental illnesses are more than five times as likely to be in jail or in prison than in a hospital treatment bed. For rural Coloradans, mental health services can be hundreds of miles away, or simply put, unavailable. In a state that has suffered mass shooting tragedies rooted in mental illness, intervention is still exceedingly difficult, and the series explores the reasons why.