Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "healthcare" ...

  • Hurricane Maria’s dead

    On September 20, 2017 Puerto Rico was devastated by the strongest hurricane that has hit the island in the last century. In the weeks after the storm, the government insisted there were only a few dozen deaths, but reporting on the ground by the Center for Investigative Journalism suggested there were hundreds. Officials also refused to provide overall mortality statistics that could help measure the impact of the storm. Given the lack of a reliable official death toll, we put together our own database with information collected from family members through an online survey, reporting, and tips. We verified those deaths by matching the victims’ names with government death records CPI eventually obtained through a lawsuit, and through nearly 300 phone interviews with victims’ relatives. We analyzed that material, as well as historic demographic data, to detect changes in mortality trends after the storm.
  • Sick and Imprisoned

    This entry chronicles an investigation into the healthcare of inmates at the Hampton Roads Regional Jail, including the treatment of the mentally ill. It starts with the death of Henry Stewart, who was vomiting blood and begging for help from officials in the days before he died. The investigation goes on to detail how the jail treated inmates such as Jamycheal Mitchell, who died a year before Stewart, as well as the larger problems with how Virginia cares for the incarcerated and mentally ill.
  • Bad Medicine Behind Bars

    The death of inmate Mario Martinez in Alameda County’s jail led 2 Investigates to uncover a web of medical negligence, gaps in oversight, and cozy connections to public officials accepting money. We analyzed hundreds of pages of medical records, coroner’s reports, and court documents, which showed that despite multiple court orders the jail’s medical provider, Corizon Healthcare, repeatedly denied surgery to Martinez before his death.
  • Revealed: Pfizer's Payments To Censured Doctors

    They are as billed as "healthcare professionals who spend years building expertise in their fields." Using material surrounded in science, they educate their peers in the risks and benefits of drugs. This is how Pfizer, the pharmaceuticals giant, describes the experts it hires to lead forums in which doctors are lectured on the use of its products.
  • Healthcare crisis, Corp. Fraud

    SIRF's work in exposing how Valeant, a high-flying pharmaceutical company, concealed its ownership of a specialty pharmacy that helped it to massive profits led to a multi-month drama that saw its share price cut by 75%, subpoena's and the closure of the unit.
  • How Urgent Is ‘Urgent’ Healthcare? As walk-in urgent care centers spread, so do questions about their expertise. One thing for sure: They’re not emergency rooms.

    More and more medical practices across the country are rebranding themselves as urgent care centers. Their proliferation is skyrocketing, almost unheard of two decades ago. They sound like places promising the kind of medical attention offered at emergency rooms. But they don’t. They are unregulated in New York and most other states; in New York, they are combating any effort at more oversight. For patients who go expecting emergency room-like care, there are concerns. There can result is delay in needed care, lack of equipment to do vital tests, and even fatal results. There is also a dark economic underbelly harming hospitals that actually do emergency work.
  • Ghost Panels

    The VA continues to struggle to deliver timely, quality, healthcare to veterans despite the publicity and subsequent reforms initiated by the 2014 scandal. Case in point:The VA medical system in St. Cloud, Minnesota. It's where 30 year old Ross Cameron bounced from one physician to another as he desperately tried to get help for a deep depression and PTSD. He wife says he never got the full attention he needed. Then one day he took his own life by driving into a tree at a hundred miles an hour. The St. Cloud VA is also where Doug Larson nearly died because a provider made a huge mistake. This series of reports documents the turmoil within the hospital which triggered an exodus of physicians and nurses, and the impact the staffing shortages are having on veterans healthcare.
  • Medicare Advantage Overcharges

    During 2015, Center for Public Integrity senior reporter Fred Schulte produced a dozen articles based mainly on previously secret government audits, including emails and other internal documents, released over the course of the year under a court order in our Freedom of Information Act lawsuit. Schulte revealed that federal officials repeatedly recognized that some health plans appeared to be ripping off Medicare by exaggerating how sick their patients were, but they failed to demand refunds, discipline the health plans, or curb other wasteful spending in the politically powerful Medicare Advantage program.
  • Easy Money

    WVUE’s investigation, Easy Money, exposes the state’s lucrative tax incentive program as a complicated system of corporate payouts and questions whether the multibillion cost was worth it for a state facing massive cuts to education and healthcare due to budget shortfalls.
  • Deficient Hospices Rarely Punished

    After mining a database of inspection records, Huffington Post determined that hospices frequently go three years -- and sometimes much longer -- without any regulatory scrutiny. It also showed that when hospices break Medicare's rules, endangering the safety and even lives of their frail patients, they are virtually never punished. Medicare’s regulator has punished a hospice provider just 16 times in the last decade, despite carrying out 15,000 inspections and identifying more than 31,000 violations. In each instance, the hospice’s license was terminated -- the sole recourse for regulators when they confront a hospice that breaks the rules. The system of oversight designed to ensure sound practices in an industry that has quadrupled in size since 2000 simply has no means to assess fines or other punishments. The service, which at its best provides a caring, home-based alternative to hospitalization for terminally ill patients, is increasingly how Americans die. Yet virtually nothing is known about the quality of the companies providing that service. This story reveals to consumers those hospices that regulators have determined have the most problems -- and hopefully spurring government authorities to act.