Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "human rights" ...

  • The Girl From Kathmandu: Twelve Dead Men and a Woman's Quest for Justice

    A nonfiction narrative of Iraq war profiteering, human trafficking, and the battle to defend human rights in U.S. courts. "A powerful work of investigative journalism, one that speaks volumes about the business of war and of human slavery alike.” -- Kirkus Reviews.
  • Solitary Lives: An investigation into the secret world of solitary confinement

    In prison cells across North Carolina, government officials are meting out punishment that human rights experts say amounts to torture. For more than 13 years, the state kept inmate Jason Swain in solitary confinement - a punishment that research shows often causes and exacerbates mental illness. Swain, who suffers from bipolar depression, repeatedly swallowed razors and ripped open his surgical incisions. The Observer found he was just one of seven N.C. inmates who had spent more than a decade in solitary. Even 16-year-olds are confined to solitary in North Carolina - before they’re convicted of crimes.
  • Nation Institute (TomDispatch and The Intercept) coverage of the U.S. Military in Africa

    I wrote an untitled collection of articles for The Nation Institute’s TomDispatch.com and First Look Media’s The Intercept investigating the U.S. military’s extensive and largely secret operations on the African continent. Utilizing documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act and from a whistle blower as well as a plethora of open source material, I offered a rare glimpse of the actions of a very secretive military command. Along the way, I revealed covert U.S. drone bases used for targeted killing campaigns from Yemen and Somalia to Iraq and Syria; I exposed unreported drug use and criminal behavior by U.S. forces across Africa; and shined a light on a multitude of missions in which elite U.S. forces trained alongside members of African armies regularly cited by the State Department for human rights abuses; among many other revelations. (While The Intercept may not fit the definition of a small outlet, I generally work alone and receive only spare support beyond editing. And TomDispatch is a truly tiny outlet.) https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/target-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2015/10/21/stealth-expansion-of-secret-us-drone-base-in-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2016/02/10/where-to-invade-next-is-the-most-subversive-movie-michael-moore-has-ever-made/
  • Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq’s ISIS Fight

    Torture, beheadings, the cold blooded shooting of unarmed civilians, and all of it caught on camera in war-ravaged Iraq by the perpetrators acting with impunity. But the horror show was not by ISIS this time. An ABC News investigation, "Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq's ISIS Fight," found ample evidence of terrorist-like atrocities routinely committed over the past year by U.S.-trained Iraqi Security Forces, who Washington has been arming as the key to defeating ISIS. Incredibly, elite Iraqi Special Forces, special police and counterterrorism units were documenting their own horrific acts, filling the dark underbelly of Iraqi social media with gruesome snapshots and videos of their own war crimes in an apparent effort to stir up sectarian bloodlust. In the first in-depth exposé and analysis of these atrocities, the ABC News Brian Ross Investigative Unit, led by Producer James Gordon Meek, spent six months collecting and researching a photo and video gallery of horrors, interviewing human rights investigators, U.S. Special Forces veterans and diplomats who served in Iraq, as well as confronting both the American and Iraqi governments with their findings. The team presented the investigation to millions over three consecutive nights on ABC World News Tonight With David Muir, accompanied by in-depth digital reports, both print and broadcast, on ABCNews.com and ABC/Apple TV.
  • Qatar: The Price of Glory 2015

    The Price of Glory is an HBO Real Sports investigation into Qatar’s plan to achieve international recognition through sport and the price it has exacted in fair play, human rights, and even human lives. Our investigation found that the Qatari sports plan is one of unprecedented ambition and ruthlessness, based on the exploitation of foreign labor on and off the field. To build world-class athletic teams, Qatar has crisscrossed the world, paying athletes from the poorest countries on earth to become naturalized Qatari citizens. Real Sports heard it first hand from an entire team of Bulgarian weightlifters paid by Qatar to assume Arabic identities and represent the Gulf state in international competition. Our story detailed the systemic bribery that allowed this stiflingly hot desert sheikhdom without a soccer tradition to improbably win the right to host the 2022 World Cup. Ten months before a series of arrests of FIFA officials suspected of taking bribes, Real Sports spoke with a former FIFA insider about the corrupt bidding process, and detailed how Qatari officials bought their way to the very top of world soccer by plying FIFA officials on five continents. Off the field, Real Sports documented how Qatar’s sports glory is built on the backs of hundreds of thousands of the poorest people in Asia, imported and indentured to create a lavish World Cup city in the desert. Our team watched workers toil in 117-degree heat and followed them into the decrepit labor camps few outsiders have seen in order to expose the brutal conditions in which they are bonded into effective slavery. Viewers will see why thousands of these migrant workers are projected to die on the job by the time the 2022 World Cup games begin. When we first aired the piece the Qatari government told us changes were coming and that we should stand by. We took them up on their offer and revisited the situation a year later, only to find that none of the changes to the bonded labor system—known as Kafala—had taken place. In fact Nepali migrant workers were even prohibited from returning home after a massive earthquake ravaged their country. Worse still—our follow-up investigation found that some of the top people in Qatari sport weren’t just using their money to buy athletes, they were using it to fund terrorist organizations and invite radical jihadi clerics to speak at their elite sports academy. Our project spanned four years of research, four continents, and scores of interviews with athletes, activists, migrant workers, FIFA insiders, and US government officials.
  • The Price of Glory

    Days after the completion of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, HBO’s “Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel” looked ahead and across the world to Qatar — the tiny desert sheikhdom that had improbably won the right to host the 2022 World Cup. The “Real Sports” report told the story of how this largely obscure but wildly-rich nation – the wealthiest per capita on earth – had embarked on a plan to put itself on the map through sports. But they would make that march to glory at seemingly any cost – be it fair play, human rights, or even human lives. Blessed with the largest deposits of liquefied natural gas in the world, Qatar has developed a national sports plan like the world has never seen.
  • DC taxis for all? WUSA9 undercover video documents broken system and broken promises

    Working overnights and weekends for a year, undercover WUSA9 cameras documented repeated, blatant discrimination against black, blind, and wheel chair passengers and broken promises from the agency in charge to fix it. In response to the WUSA9 investigation, DC Taxicab Commission Chairman Ron Linton is battling a call for his resignation while at the same time bungling agency responses to each broadcast. The DC Office of Human Rights credited WUSA9 for promting its own investigation into Linton's response, the DC Taxicab Commission, and the DC Taxicab industry. Meantime, our cameras continue to document daily racism on the streets of the nation's capital where, in our tests, 25% to 33% of black passengers were ignored by drivers, who often were caught on tape stopping for white decoy passengers 100 feet down the street.
  • Collapse into chaos

    This entry includes investigative stories written by AP reporter Alberto Arce over a 22-month period chronicling Honduras’s collapse into chaos in the aftermath of a coup in 2009. Arce’s stories uncovered government-sanctioned death squads, the violation of U.S. protocols in the shooting deaths of civilians by forces trained and vetted by the U.S., human rights abuses in prisons, and the general corruption and impunity among police and military forces.
  • Private Prisons

    The Palm Beach Post uncovered a little-understood aspect of Florida’s criminal justice system running roughshod over taxpayers and inmates alike. Against a backdrop of state-approved secrecy, documents detailing security lapses and basic prison operations were routinely hidden from public view.
  • Collapse into Chaos

    This entry includes investigative stories written by AP reporter Alberto Arce over a 22-month period chronicling Honduras’s collapse into chaos in the aftermath of a coup in 2009. Arce’s stories uncovered government-sanctioned death squads, the violation of U.S. protocols in the shooting deaths of civilians by forces trained and vetted by the U.S., human rights abuses in prisons, and the general corruption and impunity among police and military forces.