Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "juvenile justice system" ...

  • NBCLA: Pepper Spray Use Skyrockets at Juvenile Hall

    The use of pepper spray by probation officers at Los Angeles County juvenile halls and camps has skyrocketed over the last few years, prompting an investigation and raising concerns as similar agencies across the country are banning pepper spray use, citing health concerns.
  • Descent into Disorder

    An investigation into the state of Wisconsin's broken juvenile justice system and warning signs that were ignored for years, leaving young inmates injured and guards undertrained, overworked and largely unaccountable.
  • Mass. courts fail to shield juveniles in holding areas

    Since Sept. 2010, Massachusetts has been in violation of a federal law requiring courthouses to protect juveniles from being verbally abused or threatened by adult inmates in courthouse holding areas. This has resulted in annual penalties that slashed about $500,000 in grant money intended for at-risk youth and intervention programs in the Massachusetts juvenile justice system. It’s a problem that will cost $1.34 million to fix 11 “high priority” courts, as Massachusetts officials sought — and failed to receive — a waiver from those penalties from the Justice Department.
  • Prisoners of Profit

    HuffPost Business reporter Chris Kirkham exposes the corruption at juvenile for-profit prisons, boot camps and detention centers. From condoning abuse of inmates to neglect to corruption, Kirkham uncovers firsthand stories from those on the inside.
  • Trouble in Mind

    Brandi Grissom spent nearly six months investigating the life, trial, conviction and incarceration of Andre Thomas. The six-part series explores the intersections of the mental health and criminal justice systems in Texas through the case of Andre Thomas, a death row inmate who began exhibiting signs of mental illness as a boy and committed a brutal triple murder in 2004. Blind because he pulled out both of his eyes while behind bars, Thomas awaits a federal court's decision on whether he is sane enough to be executed. The series examines the gaps in the Texas mental health system: holes in public education, the troubled juvenile justice system, underfunded mental health care services for adults, unprepared prisons and the still-developing jurisprudence around brain science. In addition to producing six in-depth stories, Grissom partnered with data reporters in the newsroom to produce interactive graphics that helped readers understand that disparities in the mental health system. She also partnered with the graphics team to create a comprehensive interactive timeline that detailed the tragic events of Thomas’ life, his crime, and his case with court documents and photos.
  • Assault victim's tweets prompt contempt case

    For 17-year-old Savannah Dietrich, it was like being victimized twice – first by the two boys who sexually assaulted her while she was passed out and then sent photos of the assault to their friends; secondly, by a secretive juvenile justice system that appeared more interested in protecting her attackers than her. Frustrated by what she felt was a lenient plea bargain for her two attackers, Savannah lashed out on Twitter – despite a judge’s warning that no one should talk about the incident because the case was in juvenile court. "There you go, lock me up," Savannah tweeted, as she named the boys who she said sexually assaulted her. "I'm not protecting anyone that made my life a living Hell." Though threatened with contempt of court, Savannah refusal to stay quiet, and her decision to talk publicly to Courier-Journal reporter Jason Riley resulted in a series of stories that drew national attention and helped pry the lid off Kentucky’s secretive juvenile courts – potentially opening more cases in the future to ensure justice is done.
  • A Horrible Answer

    Fire years into massive reforms, Washington, D.C.'s pledge to create a more compassionate juvenile justice system remains unfulfilled, and youth in the custody of the city are killing and dying at epidemic proportions. This series looked comprehensively at the statistics and the stories behind a year's worth of deadly violence among juveniles in the custody of the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS), in most cases because they had a juvenile criminal record. Reporters found that during the year they studied, one in five homicides in the city involved a youth in the custody of the city as either a victim or a suspect.
  • Juvenile Justice: A Secret World

    This investigation looks into the juvenile justice system of Kentucky and secrecy laws intended to protect juvenile offenders and help them transition back into society. The series questions whether or not these secrecy laws are protecting the juvenile offenders or injuring the community by not revealing juvenile sex offenders and those convicted of violent acts. The investigation also analyzes whether funds spent on rehabilitating the youth has been worth it.
  • Voices and Silence

    This investigation uses Jason Molacek, a teenager who heard voices that drove him to kill his mother, as an example to illustrate the failings of Minnesota's juvenile justice system. The article covers all of the ways that the system is flawed and compares it to other states.
  • Losing Christopher

    The Oregonian's three-day series on 14-year-old Christopher Hutchinson, whose "mental illness is so severe his family fears he will hurt someone, but his care falls through the cracks of the state mental health system."