Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "law enforcement" ...

  • From criminal to cop in Alaska’s most vulnerable villages

    The rape and death of a teenage girl in a remote Alaska village led to this investigation revealing that Alaska communities routinely hire criminals as police officers.
  • Forcing the Peace

    WCPO's I-Team investigated police use of force involving officers at 32 local police departments. Our investigation uncovered excessive force, unreported use of force and identified the police officer who punched more people in the face than any other local cop. We also revealed black children were more likely than adults to be tased by police.
  • She Says

    WFAE’s She Says is an investigative podcast series that followed the story of a sexual assault survivor in Charlotte, NC and the long and difficult process of finding justice. Over the course of the series, award-winning WFAE reporter/host, Sarah Delia and reporter Alex Olgin investigated how our criminal justice system handles sexual assault cases on a local and national level. In addition to conversations with the sexual assault survivor at the heart of this story, the podcast features interviews with current and former law enforcement, specialized nurses, DNA experts, and other sexual assault survivors.
  • FLIPPED: Secrets Inside a Corrupt Police Department

    A year-long investigation by a one-man-band investigative reporter revealed institutional and systemic failures inside a large Metro Atlanta police department. By cultivating internal police sources, he was able to demand specific, hidden public records that uncovered the following scandals the Roswell Police Department tried to keep secret from the public: Officers arrested a driver for speeding using a ‘coin flip’ app; Police covered up a K9 brutally mauling a teen suspect who had already surrendered; Top sergeant intentionally froze a 13-year-old boy to get him to tell the truth; Department concealed the release of a suspected drunk driver - one of its own officers; and Officer failed to help a dying prisoner because that officer was already under investigation. This investigation and public records fight resulted in the resignation of the police chief, the firing of three police officers, and an overhaul of the city's open records system to improve public access.
  • Protecting the Shield

    “Protecting the Shield” exposed the deaths and injuries caused by out-of-control rogue cops who are knowingly left on the streets by their superiors. This exhaustive indictment of government failings shows how weak police oversight cost citizens their lives, honest officers their careers and taxpayers tens of millions of dollars. Our work prompted police reforms, including random drug testing of all police officers and a statewide internal affairs overhaul.
  • Black drivers bear brunt of citations from routine stops by St. Anthony PD

    After the fatal police shooting of Philando Castile during a traffic stop in a St. Paul suburb, MPR News set out to investigate whether black drivers were disproportionately stopped by the law enforcement agency involved with Castile’s death. MPR analyzed thousands of traffic citations in a five-year period from the St. Anthony police department and focused our investigation on stops in which police had the most discretion to pull someone over. They expected to see some level of racial disparity, but the results were staggering.
  • Analyzing police use-of-force data

    After a yearlong open records battle, the San Antonio Express-News obtained and analyzed a use-of-force database from the San Antonio Police Department. The records showed that officers used force against black and Hispanic suspects at a rate that was up to 78 percent higher than white suspects, yet less than one percent of 5,300 force incidents resulted in any kind of policy violation. The newspaper brought those stunning numbers to life with police suspension records, video, DocumentCloud and interviews with victims -- including an innocent man who was paralyzed after he underwent surgery to treat injuries from a police beating.
  • The death of Korryn Gaines

    These stories explored the death of Korryn Gaines after a six-hour standoff with Baltimore County police. Baltimore Sun reporters were able to shed light on the incident with stories about Gaines’ past encounters with police and social media postings, an exclusive interview with the neighbor who allowed police to drill holes in the wall he shared with Gaines’ apartment so they could monitor her movements, and another exclusive on court documents showing that police sought Gaines’ private Facebook messages and other account information. Reporters also explored other angles, such as the role social media is playing in encounters with police across the country. Finally, reporters gained exclusive access to the investigative file that provided a trove of information on how the standoff went down.
  • Why Some Problem Cops Don’t Lose Their Badges

    A Wall Street Journal examination shows how states allow some police officers to remain on the force despite misconduct.
  • A Cry for Help

    The trend was unmistakable. Minnesotans who were suicidal or otherwise having a mental health crisis were dying in confrontations with police. The Star Tribune decided to go beyond the anecdotes and develop the first comprehensive database of individuals killed after encounters with police in Minnesota. An exhaustive analysis of death certificate data, news accounts, police reports and other records revealed a powerful statistic: 45 percent of those who died in forceful encounters with police were in crisis or had a history of mental illness. The number was even more stark for 2015: nine of 13 killed fell into that category. The Star Tribune multimedia project “A Cry for Help” showed the collision of a broken mental health system with law enforcement, the responders of last resort. While questions of police conduct and use of force have revolved around race, one advocacy group estimated that mentally ill people are 16 times more likely to die in a police encounter than others. Our team faced the challenge of how to tell this story in a fresh and engaging way. They did it by obtaining extraordinary access to individuals: A cop who had killed two people, each of whom threatened him amid their mental breakdowns. The mother of a young mentally ill man killed by police who now advocates for better training. A man who tried to commit suicide by cop whose survival demonstrates how these situations don’t have to end in tragedy. These narratives were enhanced by hard-fought access to dozens of police case files that included powerful police video footage of a St. Paul standoff in 2015. The project also quantified, for the first time, the stories of every person who died in an encounter with police since 2000, and that database is now continually updated on the Star Tribune website.