Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "neglect" ...

  • Dying on his watch -- Georgia female inmates denied medical care

    For nearly a decade, a succession of female prison inmates in Georgia suffered agonizing deaths from medical neglect and others in obvious distress were denied essential care as the state turned a blind eye to the physician responsible.
  • A Mountain of Misconduct

    For "A Mountain of Misconduct", Reveal teamed up with New Hampshire Public Radio health and science reporter Jack Rodolico to unveil 40 years of alleged abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at specialty rehab centers in multiple states. In our hour-long audio documentary, we took a close look at New Hampshire’s Lakeview NeuroRehabilitation Center, where people with severe disabilities were treated, and detailed that facility’s deep ties to a network of institutions across the U.S. Our reporting went back decades to look at the corrupt roots of the multibillion dollar brain injury rehabilitation industry in the 1970's and 80's, and exposed how for-profit neurological rehabilitation centers thrive on public dollars with little oversight. Additional content on the project includes a podcast extra, following up with one family who pulled their son from Lakeview after he was neglected there; a 4,000 word print piece detailing the "human trafficking", to borrow a term one disability rights expert used, that sends vulnerable people across state lines to distant facilities, and the weak state regulation that allowed Lakeview and similar institutions to prosper despite decades of complaints; and a digital interactive timeline featuring the characters in our story, from facility owners to investigators to patients, and how their lives intersected over 40 years.
  • Missed signs. Fatal consequences.

    A series of stories about how Texas state law required the filing of a child fatality report when a child dies of abuse or neglect, but no one looked at them afterward to look for patterns, trends or red flags to help prevent such deaths in the future. So we analyzed them and reported on what we found. http://projects.statesman.com/news/cps-missed-signs/ https://github.com/statesman/cps/
  • Left for Dead and the interactive database, The Lost & The Found

    Left for Dead is the first national examination of Jane and John Does and the failures of sheriffs and coroners to identify unclaimed and unnamed bodies – a problem the Department of Justice has called “the nation’s silent mass disaster.” G.W. Schulz’s exhaustive reporting exposed the challenges of identifying them. Those challenges, he found, range from neglect, indifference and a lack of will by local authorities, to three unsuccessful attempts in the U.S. Congress to require police and death investigators to use an existing national registry of missing people. Following his reporting, the bill was reintroduced this year. Reveal obtained federal data that tracks unidentified bodies, which informed our reporting. We also built an online tool for matching missing people with unidentified bodies.
  • Elder Abuse Unreported

    This KXAN investigation uncovered allegations of sexual assault at Longhorn Village, a retirement community and assisted living center created by the University of Texas Alumni group, Texas Exes. They found that despite having evidence abuse and neglect occurred, the state agency that regulates and investigates assisted living facilities found no wrong doing. Their analysis of abuse investigations data showed the vast majority of abuse and neglect cases in assisted living facilities were “unsubstantiated” by state investigators.
  • In Need of Care

    The series has shed light on the fact that the state agency charged with protecting children, the Kansas Department for Children and Families, often fails to do so. Reports often are screened out or unsubstantiated. In the case of "The Girl in the Basement," there were more than two dozen previous reports of abuse and neglect, including by mandatory reporters such as teachers and nurses, that appear to be all but overlooked before police removed the girl from her home.
  • Death in Paradise

    Two-story series on a Key West in-custody death which led city officials to ask the Department of Justice for a thorough investigation not only of Key West Police, but also of the state law enforcement agency, the district attorney and the county medical examiner. GM retiree Charles Eimers died following a routine traffic stop in Key West on Thanksgiving 2013. Police told emergency responders that Eimers fled a traffic stop, then ran away and collapsed on the beach, but a cell phone video acquired by CBS News showed Eimers surrendering before being surrounded by officers. Months later, CBS obtained a second tourist video that clearly showed police lied under oath in video depositions about the possibility that Eimers had been suffocated in the sand while being placed under arrest. Police and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which was called in to investigate the in-custody death, both had contact information to obtain the tourist video, but neglected to obtain it over the course of a seven month investigation.
  • Austin Emergency Response Failures

    This series of investigative stories uncovered an overwhelmed 9-1-1 center staff during the deadly “Halloween Flood” of 2013 in Austin, Texas and triggered proposed changes to Austin’s 9-1-1 system. Open records requests returned 9-1-1 calls and emails showing the impact earlier cost-cutting decisions had the morning of the flood. The records we uncovered show the City of Austin was underprepared to respond to this overnight emergency and any others of its scale. The series morphed into an examination of the City of Austin’s 9-1-1 center and how years of neglect led to a controversial and unreported plan to save overtime. After the City of Austin released its final flood report and KXAN questioned the small number of recommendations, police leaders announced a 9-1-1 system audit. After KXAN reported a leaked draft, police amended a budget list of critical needs requesting 36 new 9-1-1 positions.
  • Nursing home inspections

    Inspections find peril in central Illinois nursing homes highlighted the continued risk of injuries, infections and medication errors residents of area-wide nursing homes face despite state reform. CU-CitizenAccess.org found dozens of problems cited in state inspection reports, compounded by steep fines and lawsuits. Further, CU-CitizenAccess.org found federal rating systems of nursing home care often misleading. In one case, a 71-year-old man died following medication errors and neglectful care.
  • Cell of squalor, weeks of despair

    A Harris County jail inmate, jailed on a marijuana charge while on probation and in need of mental health care, was left in his cell for weeks without being let out, living amid heaps of trash, swarms of bugs, and piles of his own feces. When inspectors with a jail compliance team entered the cell of inmate Terry Goodwin on October 10, 2013, he was wearing a filthy, shredded jail uniform in the fetid cell. Shards of his orange uniform were hanging from the ceiling light. His sink, toilet and shower drain were clogged, not just with feces, but with toilet paper in an apparent attempt by Goodwin to cover his own waste and with orange rinds, perhaps in futile effort to mask the smell. That’s when the cover-up began.