Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "officials" ...

  • Desperate Choices: Giving Up Custody For Care

    Lisa Chedekel, senior writer, Connecticut Health I-Team, uncovered a practice within the state's Department of Children and Families (DCF) of coercing parents of children with severe behavioral problems to give up custody of their children, in exchange for needed care. Although DCF officials said the practice was rare, C-HIT found that more than 860 children were given up to state custody since 2011 because their families could not access "specialized care." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfa8wsOdrog
  • On Your Dime

    WVUE-TV’s “On Your Dime” is a true enterprising investigative series. None of the stories was generated via a tip, but instead by proactive and dogged investigating by the WVUE-TV team. Our investigative team’s extensive research drove “On Your Dime” and uncovered questionable activity and spending by officials. “On Your Dime” launched investigations by several agencies. https://vimeo.com/196277083/2ea38bda5e
  • Reliving Agent Orange

    Four decades after the Vietnam War, scientists are still learning how exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange has harmed veterans and their children. This report showed that the Department of Veterans Affairs has hesitated to compensate sick veterans, instead weighing political and financial costs in secret. To bolster their position, they found that government officials have routinely turned to a known skeptic of Agent Orange’s deadly effects – a scientist who has also been paid by the chemical makers. And they obtained internal VA data on hundreds of thousands of vets and conducted a first-of-its-kind analysis, producing new evidence suggesting a connection between Agent Orange and birth defects that experts say should force the government to take action. https://www.propublica.org/article/agent-orange-vietnam-veterans-their-families-share-stories-exposure https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/alvin-young
  • Chicago does little to control police misconduct - or its costs

    The City of Chicago spent more than $210 million for police misconduct lawsuits from 2012 to 2015, according to a Chicago Reporter analysis. The Police Department exceeded its annual budget for lawsuits by almost $50 million, on average, in each of those years. Yet, unlike some other major cities, Chicago doesn’t analyze the lawsuits for trends, identify the officers most frequently sued, or determine ways to reduce both the cost of the cases and officer misconduct. Rather than rein in the practices that lead to these settlements, officials have borrowed millions to pay for police lawsuits, adding to the city’s crippling debt.
  • The Wet Prince of Bel Air

    During a time of severe drought, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting wanted to learn more about the users of the most water in California. Reporters found that one homeowner in Los Angeles’ posh Bel Air neighborhood had used 11.8 million gallons of water in a single year during a drought emergency and that 4 of the top 10 known mega water users were also in Bel Air. But city officials wouldn’t reveal who those customers were. So in a follow-up story, Reveal used satellite analysis and public records to identify the seven most likely culprits. https://www.revealnews.org/article/the-wet-prince-of-bel-air-who-is-californias-biggest-water-guzzler/
  • Contaminated Soil Lingers Where Apples Once Grew

    An Oregon Public Broadcasting and Northwest Public Radio collaboration found Washington officials failed to address known soil contamination at former orchard sites, leaving children at risk of exposure that could elevate their risk of lowered IQ, behavioral problems or cancer later in life.
  • Potter County, Pennsylvania: Private & Public Drinking Water Sources Contamination by Illegal Chemicals

    Public Herald broke the story about groundwater and surface water contamination from drilling operations by JKLM Energy in Potter County that impacted private and public water supplies. Since our first breaking report, we have been contacted by residents who informed us that they were not notified that the local groundwater had been contaminated, continued to use their water and experience stomach and digestive pain and discomfort. County officials applaud the industry for being "responsible" despite illegal operations and a refusal by the company to release a full list of chemicals that contaminated water sources.
  • Complaint Report

    After a 30-month analysis, a Public Herald investigation into fracking complaints uncovered 9 ways officials at the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) kept drinking water contamination across Pennsylvania “off the books” since 2004.
  • Bottled Water from a National Forest

    The Desert Sun revealed in a series of investigations that the U.S. Forest Service has been allowing Nestle to pipe water out of a national forest to produce bottled water using a permit that lists an expiration date of 1988. The newspaper found that Forest Service officials failed to follow through on plans for an environmental review that would have assessed whether the use of water for bottling is harming sensitive habitat along a creek. The Desert Sun also obtained records showing the agency hasn’t examined the environmental impacts of hundreds of expired permits that allow for the use of water from national forests.
  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.