Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "officials" ...

  • Problems in Paradise

    Virgin Islands Daily News and Gannett News Service investigate widespread government corruption, fraud, waste, and gross mismanagement by Virgin Islands officials using public funds. The investigation finds millions of dollars being paid for goods and services never delivered and not procured through competitive bidding in addition to questionable payroll checks, millions of dollars worth of heavy equipment going unused, and misappropriations and over-payments to contractors.
  • Local Hospital Conducts Business Without Competitive Bids

    Middlesex News (Framingham, Mass.) discovers officials at a local hospital conducted thousands of dollars worth of business without submitting competitive bids.
  • Children Left in Abusive Foster Homes

    Imperial Valley Press (El Centro, Calif.) uncovers evidence that, even after sexual abuse was confirmed, welfare officials allowed children to remain in a foster home.
  • Tuscon Water Supply Tainted by Carcinogen

    Arizona Daily Star uncovers evidence that TCE, a probable carcinogen, may have caused 500 cases of cancer and lupus in a Tucson neighborhood through its water supply; shows how health officials have ignored the problem for years.
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    Syracuse Herald-Journal reveals union officials doing union business while being paid by local government.
  • The Hermann Hospital Estate

    Houston Post uncovers a hospital established for the poor but used by others for their own gain: assets were squandered on luxuries for employees and trustees, while less than three percent of the hospital's revenue went to charity care; series details officials' insider and sweetheart deals, kickbacks, gambling trips and the use of estate property for personal entertainment.
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    L.A. Weekly does a lengthy investigation of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and finds it was serving many of its customers water that exceeded California guidelines for a suspected human carcinogen; DWP officials never made the problem public.
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    Kansas City Star looks at J. Nelson Happy, the principal owner of a bank who mixed banking, building restoration and public assistance and got a financial disaster; public officials who provided Happy with funds were also borrowers from Happy's bank.
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    Miami Herald finds planning and zoning officials in the Florida city of Hialeah regularly let their own real estate interests conflict with their public duties and responsibilities.
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    The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pa.) alerts New York City residents to a cover-up by city officials of threats to contaminate the city's water supply with plutonium; evidence collected from water pipes showed that, though below dangerous levels, there was plutonium in New York's water system.