Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "officials" ...

  • PublicSource: Revelations of police technology problems spark FBI scrutiny, alleged retaliation and unfinished work

    For the first time, PublicSource reported how Pittsburgh's reform-minded police chief touched off an FBI investigation into how city employee's handled software contracts. Included were projects that were never implemented by 2018, though they were fully paid for five years earlier using federal funds. The federal investigation ended without any charges, but internal investigations in the city were ongoing. A former officer also claims he faced retaliation for reporting concerns about tech projects, specifically from one of the city's highest ranking public safety officials. He is currently suing the city over several of the same concerns first publicly reported in our stories. Our stories led directly to internal changes in city purchasing and increased scrutiny of purchasing by City Council.
  • PublicSource: Pittsburgh's lack of cybersecurity and transparency

    The City of Pittsburgh's cybersecurity is lacking, according to a commissioned report, and officials won't address the issues publicly. That same report found serious issues with the way the city handles software and other IT projects and how it structures its Department of Innovation & Performance. Through a public records request and "copy and paste" sleuthing, PublicSource revealed details about how city cybersecurity and IT practices are lacking, potentially putting citizens and local government at risk.
  • Orange County Register/Southern California News Group: Olympic sports sex abuse

    This Is the Orange County Register’s investigation into decades of sexual abuse within American Olympic sports, the culture that enabled that abuse and the lengths top officials and coaches have taken to cover up that abuse leaving unsuspecting young athletes still vulnerable to predatory coaches and officials.
  • OCCRP: The Brotherhood of Killers and Cops

    In Russia, Aslan “Big Brother” Gagiyev is called the “No. 1 killer.” He was the architect of the “Family,” an elite murder squad that killed dozens and included high-ranking law enforcement officials among its ranks. Roman Anin sat down with Gagiyev to hear his story.
  • NPR/Frontline: Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • NJ Advance Media: The Force Report

    A 16-month investigation by NJ Advance Media that found New Jersey's system for tracking police force is broken, with no statewide collection or analysis of data, little oversight by state officials and no standard practices among local departments. Two decades ago, officials envisioned a centralized database that would flag dangerous cops, preventing unnecessary injuries and costly excessive force lawsuits. But that database was never created. So we built it.
  • NewsChannel 5 Investigates: Toxic School Water

    This yearlong investigation – more than two dozen stories that culminated in an hourlong, primetime special -- exposed students drinking lead-contaminated water inside Nashville schools, parents being kept in the dark about the test results, as well as officials secretly plotting to bypass lead filters to save money and using testing methods that disguised the real contamination. Through persistence and dogged reporting, we exposed a scandal that would make national news in 2018. As a result, the head of facilities for the school district was forced to resign. District officials were also pressured by Nashville’s mayor and health department to reform their testing practices. In addition, our intense focus on the issue in 2018 would be credited with reviving legislation that’s designed to help keep children across Tennessee safe.
  • National Observer: First Nations and the Trans Mountain Pipeline

    National Observer’s reporting revealed how the Canadian government made a politically-motivated decision to approve a major west-coast pipeline expansion project, knowingly violating its legal duty to consult affected Indigenous communities. The reporting has contributed to significant delays in the project, followed by the withdrawal of energy company Kinder Morgan, and a government takeover of the project. The reporting has largely left the project in limbo, and will force federal officials to improve its efforts to accommodate First Nations if it wants to proceed with the pipeline expansion. Meanwhile, a key federal cabinet minister has been reassigned and oil companies have scaled back plans to expand production in Alberta either directly or indirectly related to the investigation by National Observer.
  • MSNBC: "Bag Man"

    This 7-episode documentary podcast series released in October 2018 dug into the scandal and resignation involving former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew in the Fall of 1973. The series featured extensive interviews with those involved, as well as months of in-depth research that brought to light aspects of the story that were unknown to the prosecutors at the time and that revealed the potentially criminal actions of high-ranking public officials, including not only a sitting President of the United States, but a future President, as well.
  • Live 5 News: Failure to Protect

    A Charleston County School employee was arrested & charged with molesting 2 kids at a local elementary school. A Live 5 Investigation uncovered that school officials previously discovered child porn on his work issued laptop, but rather than firing him or placing him on administrative leave, they promoted him and named him employee the year. He was given new access to students, where he created the “Distinguished Gentlemen’s Club” and was later charged with molesting 2 children.