Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "politicians" ...

  • Business or Pleasure: How Senators Spend Campaign Contributions

    The Gannett News Service investigates Senate campaign spending and finds that Federal Election Commission regulations have had limited effect; many incumbents continue to use contributions to enhance their private lifestyles. The series shows how Senators spend their huge campaign funds and how they often augment their salaries and benefits (provided by taxpayers,) by diverting contributions to their personal coffers. They use campaign funds to pay for fancy meals, vacations and clothing; and for leasing expensive cars and renting apartments.
  • Casualties of War

    The Indianapolis Star spent eight months investigating the way police, prosecutors and politicians wage the war on drugs in Marion County. More than 10,500 adult drug-related arrests from 1994 and 1995 were examined and electronically mapped by location to determine where police were making the most apprehensions. The drug arrests were also compared to a database of court case dispositions to determine how each arrest charge was dealt with judicially. The analysis showed that Marion County anti-drug tactics have put thousands behind bars, mostly black men. Yet none of these strategies has halted the spread of drug use. (October 6 - 11, 1996)
  • Moneywatch

    ABC News captured on camera the backroom lobbying and partying that is often talked about but rarely videotaped at the political conventions. ABC caught influential politicians taking free rides on corporate jets, deep sea fishing and golfing with the industry lobbyists they are supposed to regulate, and saw them give the wealthiest contributors special access. (August 9 - 29, 1996)
  • The School Lease Fleece

    In recent years, New York City's public schools have been stretched to their limits by an influx of new immigrants flooding into the already-crowded, aging, 1,000-building school system. The Daily News investigates city politicians' response to the crisis. Politicians knew the crunch was coming but did nothing to fund school construction. Instead, officials allowed politically connected landlords to benefit from the situation by winning lucrative leases at inflated prices. (April 11 - May 28, 1996)
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    In These Times reports on aggressive new border enforcement that has not really deterred illegal immigration. Many immigrants cross the border in hopes of finding work. Operation Gatekeeper is the federal government's latest border-enforcement project. The $46 million operation is said to reflect the growing wave of xenophopia in the country and among politicians. (Sept. 16, 1996)
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    Black politicians are often targets of vigorous and very public prosecutions. In this article George looks at how the FBI often systematically marks minority politicians for police investigations. When caught black politicians often receive harsh punishments while white colleagues accused of the similar crimes receive mere slaps on the wrist.
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    The urban America at greatest risk may be the smaller and mid-sized cities once reliant on smokestack industries. Overlooked by politicians and overshadowed in the media by big cities, many of these communities lack the resources to right themselves. The Dallas Morning News looks at these cities as they drift toward an uncertain future while economic development heads elsewhere and Washington reassesses its priorities. (Dec. 3 - 6, 1995)
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    This Dallas Observer series examines the waste management situation in Ferris, Texas. A company called Waste Management bought out the town dump, located in a black neighborhood. The neighborhood has since been torn apart, infested with rats and roaches. In the midst of all of this, the company is now seeking state approval for an enormous expansion of the landfill, buying out the homes of residents in the midst of the dump site. (November 10 - 16, 1994)
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    The National Journal looks at how two Republican lawmakers are trying to preserve 1.8 million acres of Utah's wilderness. Many other politicians want more land to be made available for coal mining, oil and natural gas development, and other developments to help Utah's economy.
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    The Harris County Community Supervision and Corrections Department is a ninety million dollar a year criminal justice bureaucracy, one of the largest probation departments in the country. A wide ranging investigation exposed lax supervision, non-existent drug and alcohol counseling at a multi-million dollar county facility, suspicious real estate deals, financial mismanagement, secret contracts with politicians. KTRK also documented the use of probationers as personal servants for employees of non-profit agencies who get to use convicted criminals for community service work. (May 15 - 19, 22 - 24, June 6, 7, 14, 20, 22, July 14, 17, 23 - 27, 31, Aug. 16 - 18, 28, 30, Sept. 1, 4, 7, 8 & Nov. 1, 1995)