Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "public records" ...

  • Drivers Under Siege

    They are not police officers or firefighters, yet Bay Area bus drivers who work for the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) face some of the most dangerous working conditions with the fewest protections. Using public records and video footage, our analysis found that bus drivers with AC Transit faced more violent assaults than any other district in the San Francisco Bay Area. After we started asking questions, AC Transit announced it would test out new bus shields to protect drivers and California lawmakers introduced a federal bill in Congress with bipartisan support that will require transit districts across the country to reassess their safety measures. The new law would allocate $25 million a year for five years to pay for shields, de-escalation training, systems for transit agencies nationwide to track assault data and report that data to the Department of Transportation.
  • CNN Investigates – The Parkland Shooter

    In the hours after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, CNN began scrubbing the background of Nikolas Cruz, based on source information that he was the shooter. Working nearly around the clock, using public records requests, interviews on the ground, and a vast social media dive, CNN was able to quickly piece together a profile of a disturbed teenager who was obsessed with guns.
  • CBS: AmeriCorps Misconduct

    This CBS News Radio investigation probes allegations of widespread misconduct at the federally-funded AmeriCorps program. Part of the investigation details extensive sexual harassment allegations against the grandson of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black, Stephen Black, an Alabama attorney and founder of AmeriCorps grant recipient Impact Alabama. The report triggered Impact America to severe ties with Black, and the University of Alabama to launch a Title IX investigation before firing him as an instructor. It relied heavily on public records from FOIA requests, along with interviews with current and former Impact Alabama and AmeriCorp volunteers, lawmakers, and federal oversight officials.
  • Alabama Media Group: Dirty Business

    In 2017, federal prosecutors charged Balch & Bingham lawyer Joel Gilbert and Drummond vice president David Roberson with bribing state Rep. Oliver Robinson to help them fight the EPA. However, as Whitmire revealed, their astroturfing scheme went much further, involving public officials from a school superintendent to U.S. senators. When Whitmire requested records from the Alabama Attorney General's Office showing Luther Strange's role in the scheme, the office denied those records existed. Whitmire proved, not once but twice, that officials there were lying, and that Strange had put his name on Gilbert's work product to persuade the EPA not to help poor residents in north Birmingham clean their soil of toxins. Further, Whitmire showed a small local school district had agreed to help resist the EPA, too, denying EPA access to test schoolyards for toxins.
  • AJC: Atlanta City Hall Investigation

    Former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed’s administration illegally withheld public records from voters and City Council until The Atlanta Journal-Constitution forced them open, revealing $800,000 in improperly awarded employee bonuses and cash prizes, charges to city credit cards for personal entertainment and travel, and runaway spending on outside attorneys close to the mayor. The AJC also found that Reed withheld from the public and council the scope of the federal corruption investigation at City Hall, and concealed a six-figure settlement with an airport official who he fired and who later accused him of steering contracts.
  • How Atlanta Trampled the Public’s Right to Know: An AJC/WSB-TV Investigation

    In 2018, The AJC and WSB-TV revealed how the Kasim Reed administration illegally acted to withhold public records from the public and Atlanta City Council, doctored legal invoices to conceal the cost of a federal corruption investigation, withheld government documents to hide the scope of the corruption probe and concealed a six-figure settlement with a fired airport official.
  • The Intercept: Detained, then Violated

    The Intercept obtained hundreds of complaints of sexual and physical abuse in immigration detention, in response to a public records request with the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, which is tasked with independently reviewing the department’s various agencies, including ICE and Border Patrol.
  • FLIPPED: Secrets Inside a Corrupt Police Department

    A year-long investigation by a one-man-band investigative reporter revealed institutional and systemic failures inside a large Metro Atlanta police department. By cultivating internal police sources, he was able to demand specific, hidden public records that uncovered the following scandals the Roswell Police Department tried to keep secret from the public: Officers arrested a driver for speeding using a ‘coin flip’ app; Police covered up a K9 brutally mauling a teen suspect who had already surrendered; Top sergeant intentionally froze a 13-year-old boy to get him to tell the truth; Department concealed the release of a suspected drunk driver - one of its own officers; and Officer failed to help a dying prisoner because that officer was already under investigation. This investigation and public records fight resulted in the resignation of the police chief, the firing of three police officers, and an overhaul of the city's open records system to improve public access.
  • Testing the Waters

    "Testing the Waters" is a two-part investigation into concerns of lead contamination in local drinking water on the Alabama Gulf Coast. After an extensive analysis of public records, FOX10 News Investigates found eight water systems across Mobile and Baldwin counties have had testing results above the legal limit for lead content in the last three years. Further, FOX10 News found local public schools were not previously testing for lead content, so we requested to test for them. As a result of our investigation, both Mobile and Baldwin County Public Schools started testing some of its older schools that could be at risk. Moreover, during the course of our investigation, the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) has announced it will help test all public schools over the next three years.
  • Undisclosed police misconduct in Springfield, Mass.

    These stories document a series of misconduct allegations against Springfield, Mass. police officers which remained undisclosed by authorities until uncovered by reporters with MassLive/The Republican. Drawing on public records requests, interviews with alleged victims and tips from confidential sources, the series centers on three incidents: the death of a prisoner in Springfield Police headquarters, the suspension of a detective who threatened to kill a juvenile suspect and an investigation into allegations that off-duty officers beat a group of men after an argument at a bar. The series has led to changes in how the city reports police misconduct allegations, an effort by city councilors to reinstate a civilian police commission and an external review of the department’s internal investigations unit.