Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "rebels" ...

  • Yemen’s Dirty War: An Associated Press Investigation

    A year-long investigative series revealing how key players in Yemen’s dirty war have engaged in atrocities and corruption — torturing prisoners, deploying child soldiers and stealing food aid intended for the starving.
  • Syria: Arming the Rebels

    FRONTLINE finds Syrian rebel fighters who say they are being armed and trained by the U.S.
  • The Jihad Next Door: The Syrian Roots of Iraq’s Newest Civil War

    This is the first story to investigate and map out in detail how Al-Qaeda established a foothold in Syria after the start of the Syrian uprising in March 2011. It explains how the group now known as Islamic State used the Syrian conflict like an incubator, to rejuvenate, recruit and draw human and material resources to its base in Iraq via Syria. The story explains how the under-equipped, poorly organized moderate rebels lost ground to the increasingly influential Jabhat al-Nusra; how the West watched as a new, reformed and ultimately more dangerous version of Al-Qaeda quickly rose in Syria and reduced the space for others to operate in. Among its major findings, the piece lays bare how the Syrian government's release of jailed Islamists from its notorious Sednaya prison early in the revolution provided a ready-made network for Al-Qaeda to exploit.
  • Chemical Drift, the Second-Hand Smoke of Big Agriculture

    This series documented the dangers posed by agricultural chemicals which are applied both aerially and by land equipment. Some estimates show up to 90 percent of applied chemicals fail to hit the targeted site and drift hundreds of miles in the environment, contaminating people, water systems, air and animals. The series revealed that current safety standards were based on old theories of toxicology, which assume that the danger of chemical exposure is based on the dose. “The dose makes the poison” was the theory. That is not true with endocrine disrupting chemical pesticides that are non-monotonic, meaning that even at very low levels of exposure, significant damage can occur, especially if exposure is during childhood or fetal development. In “Pitchfork Rebels,” Howard wrote about organic farmers training to install environmental sampling devices known as Drift Catchers on their land. The resulting chemical analysis showed the presence of chlorpyrifos, an endocrine disrupting chemical insecticide linked to ADHD and autism, had drifted to their farms from an aerial application more than two miles away. The EPA banned all uses of chlorpyrifos in homes and daycare centers because of its toxicity for children, but it is still allowed in agricultural uses. This article documented the toxin’s drift to an organic farm where three young sisters live.
  • Rebels on the Backlot: Six Maverick Directors and How They Conquered the Hollywood Studio System

    This book grew out of Waxman's Hollywood coverage for the Washington Post. It examines a new, young generation of Hollywood directors in the 1990s. The book explores how the new artists adapt to the money-driven culture of Hollywood, and how the change affects their personal stake in the movie industry.
  • Warrior Class

    This is an in-depth report on the US troops and their efforts to counter terrorism. The article looks at the US troops in Colombia, fighting the armed rebels in the country. The reporter covers the activities of the Special Forces in their efforts to train the Colombian troops.
  • Investigating Sierra Leone

    Last summer, the UN-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone indicted Charles Taylor, then president of Liberiann fir crimes allegedly committed during the civil war in neighboring Sierra Leone. It was only the second time a head of state had been indicted for international war crimes while in office. Prosecutors alleged Taylor was a central figure in a global criminal network that controlled rebels in Sierra Leone who committed murder, enslavement, rape and forced children into combat. American Radio Works journalists Deborah George and Michael Montgomery closely follow the work of investigators and prosecutors as they developed the cases against Taylor and other warlords. The Special Court was established last year in a treat between the UN and the Sierra Leone government and uses a mix of national and international law.
  • A Colombian village caught in a crossfire

    The LA Times investigates a 1998 controversial bombing of a Colombian village, in which 18 people were killed. The report finds that U.S. military help played a role in the tragedy. The story refutes the Colombian military's version that the bombing was actually a premature detonation of a car bomb planted by rebels, and finds the prosecutors' charge -- that a Colombian air force helicopter actually dropped the bomb -- to be more credible. Other findings are that U.S. Customs planes, tracking a plane supposedly filled with drugs, helped initiate the bombing; two American companies provided supplies and help to the Colombian military on the day of the operation; the bombing site was under aerial surveillance of a U.S. Coast Guard officer.
  • Gunrunners

    PBS Frontline broadcasts a Center for Investigative Reporting report on arms smuggling. The story details illegal arms shipments from eastern Europe to rebels in Africa and failed international efforts to curtail the smuggling. The investigation also sheds light on the activities of Leonid Minin, a trafficker linked to Russian and Ukrainian organized crime.
  • Medical Rebels

    Public discontent with corporate medicine continues to grow and healthcare professionals have been crossing the line into subtly and overtly illegal acts--from manipulation of the system and defiance of laws they deem unjust to fraud and threats of violence--in defense of their patients.