Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "regulation" ...

  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.
  • The Debt Trap

    This weeklong investigative series revealed how car-title lending businesses in Virginia are using loopholes in the law to exploit consumers and evade regulators. Since the series aired, the governor announced he wants to crack down on the industry and several lawmakers introduced bills to address loopholes outlined in the stories. http://wamu.org/the_debt_trap
  • America’s Broken Guest Worker Program

    This three-part series examines the little-known federal H-2 visa program, revealing how it exposes tens of thousands of foreign guest workers to severe abuse and exploitation, deprives Americans of jobs that by law they are supposed to get first crack at, and makes millions of dollars for companies that take advantage of it and the government’s lax regulation. https://www.facebook.com/BuzzFeedNews/videos/1051608274860190/
  • The PCB Plague

    We discovered that a majority of public schools in Connecticut could be contaminated with toxic, cancer-causing PCBs, but no state or federal law requires schools to test for the carcinogenic chemical. Even though PCBs were banned in 1979, a loophole in federal regulations allows schools to avoid testing for PCBs, leaving the chemical in place where it emits gaseous toxins, and sending PCB particles into the air and ground during and after construction projects where it can remain for decades.
  • Hazardous Waste Regulation Challenges in California

    Despite a number of organizations overseeing the metal shredding industry, regulators have struggled to be effective in their efforts, possibly jeopardizing environmental and societal health. A deep dive into the Sims Recycling Plant in Silicon Valley uncovered decades of violations and millions of dollars of fines. And the failure to effectively police these plants are hurting local residents: in late 2013, the San Francisco Peninsula was engulfed in noxious black smoke when fires broke out at the facility.
  • APS employee drafted anti-solar letter signed by AZ congressmen

    A fight that’s been brewing for years between Arizona’s largest, monopoly energy utility and third-party solar companies has largely taken place behind the scenes or at the state’s energy regulating commission. But in late 2014, Arizona Public Service used its political connections to get members of Arizona’s congressional delegation to sign letters urging the Federal Trade Commission and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to scrutinize and possibly penalize the solar companies over allegations of wrongdoing. What was left out of the letters is that they were written by an Arizona Public Service employee, and that the utility had also previously pumped tens of thousands of dollars into the campaign coffers of those congressmen and congresswomen. The Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting used digital breadcrumbs combined with traditional shoe-leather reporting to uncover this classic case of pay-to-play political maneuvering.
  • State of Neglect

    A 30 minute KVUE Defenders investigation uncovered a dramatic rise in abuse inside Texas nursing homes and a state agency allowing it to happen. While facilities receive millions from taxpayers, investigative reporter Andy Pierrotti found regulations hamstring the state's ability to hold nursing homes accountable for continued neglect. The investigation also exposed thousands of medication errors, including nursing homes over-prescribing antipsychotic drugs more than any other state, increasing patients’ risk of death. https://vimeo.com/130982371
  • Suspect shootings

    After a series of fatal shootings by Philadelphia police that violated department regulations, The Inquirer began closely examining all big-dollar settlements of civil rights lawsuits to determine what went wrong. Reporters found officers persisted in shooting at moving vehicles, often with deadly results. They also uncovered patterns of shoddy investigations by police Internal Affairs investigators and by criminal prosecutors, typically acting with no public accountability.
  • Deleted: FINRA Erases Many Broker Disciplinary Records

    FINRA, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, systematically purges the disciplinary histories of numerous of its member advisors, dramatically undercutting the value of its BrokerCheck system that is designed to help would-be investors scrutinize the track records of advisors, a Financial Planning investigation found.
  • Wired for Profit

    Sports gambling sites have taken advantage of loopholes in gambling laws, or flouted them completely, creating a multibillion-dollar business that skirts regulators and international borders, using Internet tools that deceive even about where the sites are located.