Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "regulation" ...

  • Hidden Threat: The Kissing bug

    This investigation by KXAS-TV and The Dallas Morning News revealed kissing bugs may pose a much more significant threat to human health in Texas than the CDC has ever indicated. The bugs carry a dangerous parasite, a silent killer that can lead to heart failure and death. They have already infected hundreds of thousands of people in South America, Central America and Mexico. But, our team of reporters and producers discovered kissing bugs have also infected at least ten people in Texas. A fact revealed for the first time exclusively in the first report. Hundreds of dogs in the state are sick and many are dying. Even more concerning, the human and animal toll may be much higher than the numbers show, because few people or dogs are ever tested for the disease. This series was also the first to demonstrate how the nation’s blood supply may be at risk from kissing bugs and a lack of regulations to prevent the spread of the parasite through blood transfusions. Our reports had an immediate impact, alerting thousands of people to the presence of the bugs and the dangers they bring. Hundreds of Texans responded by sending bugs to the state lab for testing and other news organizations across the country picked up our reports taking our findings to an even wider audience. https://youtu.be/a2xykL8ixSs
  • The Dennis Hastert Scandal

    When U.S. prosecutors indicted Dennis Hastert last spring for violating obscure financial regulations connected to payments of more than a million dollars to an unnamed individual, this exclusive Brian Ross investigation exposed the true story behind the charges. Recalling a tip from 10 years earlier that came by fax during their reporting of the Mark Foley congressional page scandal, ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and Chief Investigative Producer Rhonda Schwartz located and convinced a key source to finally go public. In an exclusive interview, Jolene Burdge revealed that her now-deceased brother had been molested in his teens by Hastert, his high school wrestling coach and that there were likely other victims. While her brother never received money from Hastert, Burdge’s story helped to explain the mystery of why Hastert had been caught trying to cover up more than a million dollars of payments in hush money. http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/exclusive-woman-hastert-abused-brother-high-school-31581732 http://video-cdn.abcnews.com/160114_ire_broadcast_video_large_hastert.mp4
  • Unequal Risk

    The Center for Public Integrity’s “Unequal Risk” series highlights a long-neglected public health crisis: The deaths of some 50,000 people a year from work-related illnesses and the shamefully weak regulations governing toxic exposures on the job. Academics and advocates are pointing to our work to call attention to this grossly overlooked problem.
  • Taxi regulation

    The Honolulu Star-Advertiser examined the city's taxi industry and found lax criminal background checks, a broken city complaint hotline and loose oversight. City and state leaders immediately proposed reforms that would make the industry more effective, ethical, transparent and safe for consumers.
  • Coal Concerns

    Dozens of families living near a power plant say a giant pile of coal outside the plant is making them sick. In a year-long investigation the I-Team's Jermont Terry looks into the families' claims and takes their calls for better regulation to both the power company and state regulators. https://youtu.be/wVwesrOMT4M
  • Toxic Settlements

    For more than a decade, a deeply flawed system has allowed companies to make tens of millions off some of Virginia and Maryland’s most vulnerable residents. Bereft of scrutiny or regulation, it was easy. But the Post has now made it hard. In a series of articles, McCoy revealed the secretive world of structured settlement purchasing. Structured settlements, as opposed to traditional settlements, dispense the compensation in small installments across decades to protect the mentally-disabled and vulnerable from spending all of the money immediately.
  • Biolabs In Your Backyard: Inside America's secretive biolabs

    A USA TODAY NETWORK investigation revealed hundreds of safety accidents have occurred at secretive biolabs that have proliferated under U.S. counterterrorism policies, yet fragmented regulation lets troubled facilities keep experimenting with dangerous pathogens. Labs and regulators – often citing federal bioterrorism laws -- fought reporters seeking access to even basic information about lab accidents as well as government inspections and enforcement actions. The series has resulted in congressional investigations, an internal CDC review that prompted the replacement of a top lab regulator, and a White House recommendation for greater transparency and public accountability about lab operations and accidents.
  • In These Times: Why the United States Leaves Deadly Chemicals on the Market

    We investigated the numerous ways the chemical industry influences regulation of chemicals by the EPA and the FDA. Specifically, we discovered that industry-funded researchers have used a particular type of scientific study called “physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling” to support industry claims that economically important chemicals are safe. We found that the scientists who pioneered PBPK modeling while working for the Air Force in the early 1980s had recognized early on that PBPK studies could be used to industry’s advantage. As we examined the record over the past four decades, it became clear that these studies are primarily conducted by regulatory toxicologists working as private consultants or for research institutions funded by chemical companies. Further, these same individuals and consultancies often receive federal grants and contracts, suggesting widespread conflicts of interest. Our investigation documents the outcome – often delay or outright termination – of regulatory processes for numerous hazardous chemicals, including methylene chloride, formaldehyde, bisphenol A, perchlorate, styrene, and chlorpyrifos. While other journalists have documented the chemical industry’s political influence, to our knowledge no other journalists have brought to light the ways science itself is being manipulated.
  • Small Group Goes to Great Lengths to Block Homeschooling Regulation

    This piece explores the incredible impact a single, little-known lobbying organization has had on homeschooling regulations across all 50 states. Using brutal lobbying tactics, the Home School Legal Defense Association has been able to successfully roll back existing laws and intimidate lawmakers into withdrawing any attempt at additional regulations. The result is a largely toothless patchwork of laws, which many fear has resulted in unchecked child abuse and poor education.
  • A Mountain of Misconduct

    For "A Mountain of Misconduct", Reveal teamed up with New Hampshire Public Radio health and science reporter Jack Rodolico to unveil 40 years of alleged abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at specialty rehab centers in multiple states. In our hour-long audio documentary, we took a close look at New Hampshire’s Lakeview NeuroRehabilitation Center, where people with severe disabilities were treated, and detailed that facility’s deep ties to a network of institutions across the U.S. Our reporting went back decades to look at the corrupt roots of the multibillion dollar brain injury rehabilitation industry in the 1970's and 80's, and exposed how for-profit neurological rehabilitation centers thrive on public dollars with little oversight. Additional content on the project includes a podcast extra, following up with one family who pulled their son from Lakeview after he was neglected there; a 4,000 word print piece detailing the "human trafficking", to borrow a term one disability rights expert used, that sends vulnerable people across state lines to distant facilities, and the weak state regulation that allowed Lakeview and similar institutions to prosper despite decades of complaints; and a digital interactive timeline featuring the characters in our story, from facility owners to investigators to patients, and how their lives intersected over 40 years.