Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "service members" ...

  • AP: Hidden Victims

    The Pentagon and DOJ often fail to provide basic justice when the children of service members sexually assault each other on American military bases worldwide.
  • Charlie Foxtrot

    “Charlie Foxtrot” began as an investigation of a military policy that strips service members of their benefits and veteran status, even after serving in war zones. Our coverage culminated with a screening inside the U.S. Capitol alongside members of the U.S. House and Senate. We focused on a piece of proposed legislation with the power to give service members a second chance. Later that week, the U.S. Senate approved that bill. By year’s end, the Act of Congress was signed in to law by the President. https://vimeo.com/198371721/2d8cedd533
  • Sea Dragon Down

    The NBC News Investigative Unit, the Virginian-Pilot newspaper, tand the UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program revealed that the U.S. Navy’s Sea Dragon helicopters had killed more than 30 service members since they were launched in the 1980s, with the fatality rate rising in recent years – and that the Navy was trying to cover up the danger. The exclusive reporting of all three news organizations of the Navy’s cover-up helped spur the grounding of the entire fleet of more than 150 helicopters for most of 2015.
  • A Losing Battle

    “A Losing Battle” delves into the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (BCMR), a little-known internal panel mandated to “correct errors or remove injustices” on service members’ military records, including overturning a discharge that left them without medical benefits for service-related injuries. We found that when service members filed appeals that could lay significant blame on the Army or cost a lot of money, the default answer was no. Our investigation found that the Board routinely denied applicants their due process, uniformly denying in-person hearings, refusing to admit evidence and not responding to evidence brought, leaving service members with nowhere else to seek justice within the Armed Forces.
  • Failing the Fallen

    The series investigated the numerous failings of the Pentagon’s efforts to recover and identify remains of the more than 80,000 service members missing from past wars. On average the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command identifies just 72 service members a year.
  • A Losing Battle: How the Army denies veterans justice without anyone knowing

    “A Losing Battle” delves into the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (BCMR), a little-known internal panel mandated to “correct errors or remove injustices” on service members’ military records, including overturning a discharge that left them without medical benefits for service-related injuries. Fusion found that when service members filed appeals that could lay significant blame on the Army or cost a lot of money, the default answer was no. Their investigation found that the Board routinely denied applicants their due process, uniformly denying in-person hearings, refusing to admit evidence and not responding to evidence brought, leaving service members with nowhere else to seek justice within the Armed Forces.
  • Dishonor

    “Dishonor” shines a light on the shocking problem of rape in the U.S. military. A female soldier in a combat zone is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire. In 2010 the Pentagon estimated 19,000 service members were sexually assaulted. Of these assaults only a tiny fraction were prosecuted. Natalie Morales investigates what happened to Marine officer Claire Russo. She was brutally sodomized by a fellow marine but the Marines dropped the investigation early on. A vigilant NCIS agent assigned to her case wouldn't allow justice to die in the military so he took it to the D.A. in California, and her rapist pleaded guilty. Russo says the way the military treated her rape is typical, and her case is only unique in that she got justice. Morales spoke to a group of former service members from each branch of the military who had similar stories of sexual assault and retaliation by the military for reporting their rapes. Morales asks Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta: "are rapists getting away with rape?" In a response to all of the victims of sexual assault Panetta apologizes and vows that the military will do better. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/49202943#49202943
  • Booted From Army With PTSD, without Benefits

    According to Defense Department records, more than 20,000 soldiers and Marines were booted from the military between 2008 and 2011 with other-than-honorable discharges. Current federal law says these former service members -- even if they suffer from the mental or physical wounds of war -- lose their automatic right to veterans’ medical benefits. Those include Jarrid Starks of Salem, Oregon. He was kicked out of the Army with little more than a 90 day supply of pills to kept him stable. He appealed his case to the Veterans’ Administration. Our reporting showed it can take more than a year for the agency to come up with an answer for these troubled veterans.
  • Uncounted Casualties

    A three-day series that analyzed causes of death for 266 Texas veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. The six-month investigation uncovered previously unknown information, pulling data from a variety of federal, state and local sources. The series, which also depended on extensive interviews with family members and fellow service members, revealed the startling number of Texas veterans dying of prescription drug overdoses, suicides and motor vehicle crashes. The newspaper's analysis was hailed by epidemiologists and former Department of Veterans Affairs researchers as an important step in understanding veteran mortality, and led to calls for better government tracking of how veterans are dying.
  • Profiting from Fallen Soldiers

    Bloomberg finds that more than 130 life insurance companies have been profiting from the death benefits owed to family service members and government workers.