Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "sex offenders" ...

  • Labeled for Life

    “Labeled for Life”, a three-part investigative series, published by the Columbia Missourian in May of 2018, exposed and explored Missouri’s rigid sex offender laws months prior to a major legislative change that enabled some registrants to petition to be removed from the lifetime list. This local reporting project began as a class assignment and grew into a big national story that brought to light Missouri’s booming export of sex offenders to neighboring states where laws are not as stringent.
  • Violation of Trust

    A Belleville News-Democrat investigation found that out of 6,744 felony sex crimes reported by victims to police from 2005-2013 in 32 Southern Illinois counties, 70 percent were not prosecuted. And when they were, fewer than one in 10 suspects ever went to prison. Prosecutors blamed police, saying most of the cases they received did not have enough evidence to secure a conviction. http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index2.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index3.html http://media.bnd.com/static/media/VOT/index4.html
  • Under The Radar

    In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world.
  • Sex Offender Program

    The stories spotlighted a little-known state agency and civil commitment program that purported to be a treatment program for convicted sex offenders, revealing questionable and abusive practices and raising questions about its constitutionality. In addition to uncovering the details of questionable contracts, the stories revealed a systemic and ongoing failure by state officials to conduct the civil commitment program in accordance with state law, best practices, and its overall constitutionality. Unlike civil commitment programs in other states, Texas’ program effectively operated as an additional criminal punishment for some of society’s least sympathetic offenders, forcing them into a purported treatment and educational program no one has successfully completed in its 15-year history. The stories have sparked a nearly completed housecleaning of the Office of Violent Sex Offender Management leadership and plans for a revamp of the entire program. The state district judge who oversees most of the court cases involving the civil commitment program also is the subject of an investigation by the State Commission on Judicial Conduct. In addition to a series of investigations and a state audit underway, legislators have called for an overhaul of the program and may revisit the original authorizing law.
  • Chicago police failing to register sex offenders

    These stories detail the Chicago Police Departments systematic failure to register sex offenders. The offenders trying to follow the law are turned away from police headquarters. The department refuses to register them because they don’t have enough staff to handle the volume of offenders. The offenders are then vulnerable to arrest for ‘failure to register.’ The arresting agency is the Chicago police department, the agency responsible for their failure to register.
  • Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation of Military Sex Offenders After They Leave The Brig

    Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world. The Scripps investigation, “Under The Radar” has triggered action at the national, state and local level after exposing several major problems when convicted military sex offenders are returned to civilian life.
  • There’s not a list

    Under Colorado’s “lifetime” sentencing laws, sex offenders were supposed to remain in prison until they successfully completed a rigorous mental/behavioral health program. The intent was to fully rehabilitate them and prevent recidivism. Through months of research, 9Wants to Know also uncovered names of offenders who committed new sex crimes after release. Even after we provided those names to DOC, a prison official publicly claimed, “There’s not a list,” and the recidivism rate was zero. As a result of our investigation, DOC could no longer be in denial. The sex offender treatment program manager was replaced, and prison officials are changing the program rules and asking for more state funding.
  • Gun permit loopholes

    Nobody Denied is an unprecedented review of how a change in Iowa law two years ago resulted in nearly 150,000 people obtaining permits to carry guns in public, including people who are blind or registered as sex offenders. The law change was prompted by the desire to standardize Iowa’s weapon permit system, which had been riddled with disparities between counties. But the quickly passed law also contains loopholes that had been previously ignored or overlooked. Noteworthy in this series is the massive number of public record requests the series required. This investigation involved two separate record requests to each of Iowa’s 99 counties in addition to many records requests of the state’s public safety department.
  • A Home, But No Help

    As rates of homelessness were soaring in Hillsborough County, the local government’s program for housing the poor was in crisis. It was paying millions of dollars to slumlords who housed the homeless, including veterans and families with small children, alongside sex offenders in filthy, crime-ridden and bug-infested buildings. It was sending the sick and dying to a squalid, unlicensed home where they were abused and they languished without care. It even ensured, through a perverse misuse of a federal reimbursement plan, that a few homeless people who qualified for federal disability money stayed destitute by garnishing most of their government checks. All of this was going on, but nobody --- not top government leaders nor the taxpayers who funded it --- knew the extent of the problems. That all changed when the Tampa Bay Times started reporting on the program. A series of stories by reporters Will Hobson and Michael LaForgia brought greater transparency to local government. The stories resulted in sweeping reforms and gave the area’s vulnerable homeless a voice for the first time in decades.
  • Sex Predators Unleashed

    A 1999 Florida law passed after a 9-year-old boy was raped and murdered is supposed to protect the public by keeping the most dangerous sex predators locked up after their prison sentences end. But a Sun Sentinel investigation found the state’s safeguards broke down at every stage, setting rapists and child molesters free to harm again. Investigative reporter Sally Kestin and database specialist Dana Williams mined multiple data sources, using the state’s own records to reveal a horrific picture of recurring tragedy. The failures they uncovered prompted lawmakers to initiate the most comprehensive overhaul of Florida’s sex offender laws in more than a decade.