Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "sexual abuse" ...

  • Abusing the Law

    Sexual abuse by police officers is a pervasive problem. An officer in America wields his power or status for sexual gratification every five days, on average. Those are the ones who are caught. The actual numbers are almost certainly higher because sex crimes go widely unreported, even when the suspects are not cops. The Buffalo News compiled a database of more than 700 cases of police sexual abuse or misconduct and analyzed the variables. Typical offenders were not rookies. They had almost a decade of experience with their departments. In a surprising number of cases, children and adolescents were their targets.
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses

    The most comprehensive examination of sexual abuse within the Jehovah’s Witnesses organization and its handling of cases within its congregations, including revealing a policy of silence has kept child sexual abuse cases from law enforcement and allowed perpetrators access to victims.
  • Throwaway Kids

    Teenagers at a mental health facility tied face-down to a bed and injected with powerful sedatives as punishment for small infractions. And yet, as my investigation showed, this was common at the state-funded Citrus Health facility in Pembroke Pines, Florida, a 56-bed facility for teens dealing with mental disease, sexual abuse, and addiction. The systemic abuse didn't stop there. Public records and interviews outlined a pattern of violence and sloppy policy.
  • Police Power: A Culture of Corruption

    This special investigative show highlights KGTV’s relentless reporting into the San Diego Police Department’s culture and conduct, revealing a culture of cronyism that tolerated corrupt officers, allowed crimes to be covered up and crippled the SDPD’s ability to retain public trust and police San Diego. This reporting led to the criminal conviction of one officer, the appointment of a new police chief, a dual criminal and administrative investigation into the department by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (ongoing at the time of this submission), and several policy changes by San Diego police. Former officer Christopher Hays pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a year in jail and probation in relation to charges he sexual abused women in his custody. The case prompted San Diego Police to establish a new policy requiring two officers to accompany any female in custody.
  • UK Parliamenary Paedophiles

    This entry consists of a series of feature articles published in the daily Morning Star, UK and on-line version. They form a campaign to reveal the extent of an official Establishment cover-up of the activities of UK Parliamentary MP's involved in widespread pedophile abuse of vulnerable children. The allegations and supporting evidence stretches back decades and includes actions taken by UK Secret Intelligence Services, The Metropolitan Police, and other regional forces, the Home Office and other state institutions. The campaign tracks individual cases and high profile government Ministers of State many of whom are now deceased. Children were taken from children's homes where they were being looked after by social services staff and transported to hotels and guest houses where they were drugged and sexually abused, orally and anally raped and forced to perform sexual acts on older men.
  • Cleveland Captives Rescued

    CBS had exclusive information breaking news in this high profile case including the captor’s suicide note and its contents, that one of the women was forced to deliver the other woman’s baby impregnated by the captor, and resuscitated the baby when it was born not breathing, and how the women were chained and beaten repeatedly and what they said to police at time of rescue and other details about their ordeal. Our exclusive CBS reports were quoted extensively by other national media organizations.
  • Letter Confirms St. John's Abbey Knew About Clergy Two Years Before Releasing Names to Public

    St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Minn., released a list of 18 monks who sexually abused children on December 9, 2013. The St. John’s Abbey said the list was unveiled to achieve transparency. Through a letter obtained by UTVS News, we revealed that the St. John's Abbey knew about credible allegations of sexual abuse by Father Dominic Keller in July 2011, more than two years before Keller's name was made public by the St. John's Abbey on Dec. 9, 2013. Moreover, we found only 3 of the 18 names were new to the public. This story, done on a 48-hour deadline by UTVS News Reporter Nick Minock at St. Cloud State University, gives a voice to victims and informs viewers that at least two monks, who are credibly accused of sexually abusing minors at St. John's Abbey, still work in Minnesota parishes.
  • Betrayed by Silence

    Through the fall and winter of 2013, MPR News delivered a powerful collection of investigative radio stories that exposed how leaders of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis were continuing to cover-up the sexual abuse of children by priests. We found the archdiocese had hidden the names of abusive priests for decades, provided secret payments to pedophiles, and failed to report possible child pornography on a priest’s computer to police or warn parishioners of another priest’s sexual addiction. We exposed how two priests had secretly confessed to sexually abusing children decades ago –one was teaching sex education to troubled teenagers and the other was living half a block from a school. Our investigation peeled back the layers of false promises by leaders who had guided the national response to the clergy abuse scandal a decade earlier – and showed that children remained at risk.
  • Child Abuser

    When we got a call from a distraught family member telling us that a Navy officer had been found by a city agency to have sexually abused two of his children, but the Navy looked the other way, it seemed unlikely. When the family member told us that the officer's wife had been fined $5,000 and held in contempt of court for trying to call attention to the matter, we assumed the caller had to be mistaken. It took more than six months of reporting to nail down those troubling facts. In the meantime, the mother and children became homeless. Since the story ran, there has been an outpouring of money and a criminal investigation has been opened.
  • Chronic Condition

    Parkland Memorial Hospital is one of the largest public hospitals in the nation and the safety net for thousands of poor and minority patients in North Texas. But a multiyear investigation by The Dallas Morning News revealed systemic patient harm and prompted a federal crackdown that threatened to close Parkland.