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Search results for "solitary confinement" ...

  • The Marshall Project and USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee: Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary

    “Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary” revealed for the first time the devastating toll of Tennessee’s “safekeeper” law that puts people in solitary confinement who are mentally ill, pregnant or juveniles despite not being convicted of any crime — and sparked prompt changes to the state’s 150-year-old law.
  • Canada's role in innocent man's imprisonment

    This investigative report on the extradition of Hassan Diab to France revealed for the first time the secret efforts Canadian officials went to in order to send an innocent man to a French prison. Diab would spend more than 3 years in near-solitary confinement while he was investigated for a bombing outside a Paris synagogue. Canada went to great lengths to extradite Diab despite warnings that the French case was extremely weak. The French case ultimately fell apart due to flimsy evidence.
  • Solitary: Way Down in the Hole

    This four-part series exposed, for the first time, Minnesota’s heavy use of solitary confinement. By building a database and through prisoner interviews, we found more than 1,600 examples of inmates spending six months or longer in isolation over the past 10 years, and 437 instances of prisoners serving one year or longer. We documented more than 24,000 cases of inmates spending longer than 15 days in solitary—the time frame the United Nations defines as human torture. The series also showed how inmates come to prison with pre-existing mental illnesses and end up in isolation only to deteriorate mentally. The final installment told of the difficult path for inmates once they leave isolation. In more than 700 cases in the past six years alone, offenders left prison directly from solitary confinement.
  • Doubled Up In Solitary Confinement

    This seems like a contradiction. Put a prison inmate into a solitary confinement cell and then give him a cellmate. It’s called “double-cell solitary confinement”: Two inmates considered so dangerous and violent that they’re removed from the general prison population but then put together in one tiny cell, together for 23 to 24 hours a day. NPR’s Investigations Unit exposed this little-known practice that is common in federal and state prisons. The series showed how double-cell solitary confinement results in high levels of prison violence and sharply increases the likelihood of inmates killing other inmates.
  • Solitary Lives: An investigation into the secret world of solitary confinement

    In prison cells across North Carolina, government officials are meting out punishment that human rights experts say amounts to torture. For more than 13 years, the state kept inmate Jason Swain in solitary confinement - a punishment that research shows often causes and exacerbates mental illness. Swain, who suffers from bipolar depression, repeatedly swallowed razors and ripped open his surgical incisions. The Observer found he was just one of seven N.C. inmates who had spent more than a decade in solitary. Even 16-year-olds are confined to solitary in North Carolina - before they’re convicted of crimes.
  • The Final Days of Michael Kerr

    The death of inmate Michael Kerr by dehydration in 2014 ignited a barrage of activity in the state's corrections system and raised questions about prisoner treatment that reached the chambers of the North Carolina General Assembly more than a year later. Hundreds of pages of court documents pieced together the mentally ill veteran’s last hours in solitary confinement at a remote state prison, ignored and dismissed by an overworked corrections staff. http://www.wral.com/one-year-later-inmate-s-death-looms-over-prison-mental-health-debate/14506834/ http://www.wral.com/news/state/asset_gallery/14731191/
  • Death Inside San Carlos

    Two days after Chris Lopez walked out of a nine-and-a-half month stint in solitary confinement, the mentally ill inmate appeared catatonic on the floor of his cell inside one of the state's most notorious prisons. What happened next would lead to the firings of three corrections officers, yet for more than a year no one with the Colorado Department of Corrections would talk about it publicly. Through a confidential source, KUSA-TV obtained word of the details surrounding Lopez's death, and eventually obtained the video that forced the Colorado DOC to acknowledge a death inside San Carlos. Eventually, Colorado DOC handed out what amounts to the largest settlement in the history of the state's prison system.
  • Death Behind Bars

    A Global News investigation revealed that Canada's "psychiatric prisons," home to the penal system's sickest, most vulnerable and most volatile inmates, have the highest death and assault rates of any federal prisons. Designed, theoretically, to provide special care for Canada's growing population of inmates with severe mental illness, these prisons have become little more than warehouses for extremely ill offenders: They're kept in solitary confinement despite overwhelming evidence against it, and, Global News discovered, even so-called "intensive psychiatric care" is little more than segregation by any other name. After refusing to speak with us about this for months, Canada's Public Safety Minister announced a pilot project for two women inmates with mental illness in a groundbreaking facility specially designed for their care and rehabilitation. Global News also reported that, six months later, that pilot project had yet to materialize.
  • The Box

    Everyday in the U.S., thousands of teenagers inside jails, prisons and juvenile halls are held in solitary confinement. The practice causes severe, longterm mental illness and increases institutional violence. The Center for Investigative Reporting discovered that no federal laws limit the number of weeks or months that teenagers can be locked in isolation for up to 23 hours a day. Only seven states have placed any limits on prolonged solitary for minors.
  • Death Behind Bars

    A Global News investigation revealed that Canada's "psychiatric prisons," home to the federal penal system's sickest, most vulnerable and most volatile inmates, have the highest death and assault rates of any federal correctional facility. Designed, theoretically, to provide special care for Canada's growing population of inmates with severe mental illness, these prisons have become little more than warehouses for extremely ill offenders: They're put in brutal restraints by prison guards ill-equipped to deal with their needs, and lack sufficient access to health-care practitioners; they're kept in solitary confinement despite overwhelming evidence against it, and, Global News discovered, even so-called "intensive psychiatric care" is little more than segregation by any other name. After refusing to speak with us about this for months, Canada's Public Safety Minister announced a pilot project for two women inmates with mental illness in a groundbreaking facility specially designed for their care and rehabilitation. As part of our extensive follow-up to our initial series, Global News also reported that, six months later, that pilot project had yet to materialize.