Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "suicide" ...

  • The final days of Laura and Walton

    Laura Connell believed she was going to lose custody of her only child, Walton, despite years of abuse at the hands of her child’s father. After coming to Delaware to escape the abuse and appealing to the Delaware courts, it appeared she was still going to have to turn over her son to his father. She never did – instead killing first him and then herself on the morning of her family court hearing. Hundreds of pages of court documents, medical records and other records provided both by Laura herself and the courts detail the abuse and claims Laura said never reached a judge or were taken seriously. The story explains why mothers kill their children and what can drive parents to commit murder- suicide in a world in which we often lack those answers.
  • Northwest Jails' Mounting Death Toll

    Since 2008, at least 306 people across the Northwest have died after being taken to a county jail. Until now, that number was unknown, in part because Oregon and Washington have not comprehensively tracked those deaths in county jails. If they did, they would find a crisis of rising death rates in overburdened jails that have been set up to fail the inmates they are tasked with keeping safe. Key findings: - Over the past 10 years, the rate of jail deaths has trended upward in Oregon and Washington. In 2008, county jails in Washington had a mortality rate of about 123 deaths for every 100,000 inmates. By 2017, that rate was 162. Jail population data for 2018 were not yet available at the time of publication, but reported deaths spiked that year. A conservative estimate puts the 2018 mortality rate closer to 200 deaths per 100,000 inmates. - In 2018, police shot and killed 39 people between Oregon and Washington, according to data compiled by The Washington Post. For that same year, our investigation found 39 deaths in Oregon and Washington county jails. - At least 70 percent of Northwest inmates who died in the past decade were awaiting trial at the time of their deaths, still considered innocent under the law. - More than 40 percent of deaths happened within an inmate’s first week in jail. A third of all inmates who died never made it past three days. - Suicide, by far the leading cause of jail deaths in the Pacific Northwest, accounted for nearly half of all cases with a known cause of death.
  • Under Fire

    In a powerful segment for Dateline NBC, Katy Tur investigates allegations of sexual misconduct in the United States Forest Service and asks why, after decades of complaints and two congressional hearings, many female employees still feel like they are faced with a terrible dilemma – commit career suicide by reporting their experiences or stay silent and never see justice.
  • WNYC: New Jersery Jail Deaths

    This three-part radio series exposed New Jersey jails as among the deadliest in the nation, with no consistent method of accountability.
  • The Grader Operator

    April 1st, 2017, a snowy Easter Saturday. That's the day Brenda Duhaime thinks it all started going wrong for her husband, Robert. Robert worked as a grader operator, clearing the roads in rural Saskatchewan. But that day, his grader got stuck in a ditch. And shortly after, Brenda says he started receiving angry phone calls from work. It took a toll on his mental health -- but when Robert applied for stress leave, his claim was denied. Four months later, Robert took his own life. And now his widow is trying to get answers.
  • AP: Cops Sell Guns

    After a year’s worth of work, the AP found that law enforcement agencies in Washington state sold about 6,000 guns that had been confiscated during criminal investigations, and more than a dozen of those firearms later became evidence in new investigations. The weapons were used to threaten people, seized at gang hangouts, discovered in drug houses, possessed illegally by convicted felons, found hidden in a stolen car, taken from a man who was suffering a mental health crisis and used by an Army veteran to commit suicide.
  • ADG: Violent Reality

    Since 1999, more than 8,000 Arkansans have died by gunfire — about half of them suicides. Although many law enforcement officials and legislators say that gun-control laws might work, they are unwilling to act. The stories explore the effect of specific laws on gun violence in other states, suicide-prevention advocates' work with gun sellers to keep weapons out of suicidal individuals' possession, and federal law enforcement's efforts to keep guns out of the hands of felons.
  • 48 Hours: All-American Murder

    In “All-American Murder,” a one-hour 48 HOURS special reported by best-selling author James Patterson, we unravel the complicated life of Aaron Hernandez, a young NFL star who seemingly had it all yet wound up accused of multiple murders and ultimately killed himself in a Massachusetts prison cell. The report features interviews with people who knew Aaron Hernandez at all stages of his life and addresses the question of whether football, the one thing Hernandez loved more than anything, was responsible for his demise.
  • Colorado Jail TV Room Death: Guards 'Not Criminally Negligent'

    The story examines the Colorado First Judicial District Attorney's investigation into an inmate death in the Jefferson County Jail’s TV dayroom. Suzanne Burgaz, 55, hanged herself with a television cord, just as a patrol deputy was passing the dayroom on “walkthrough duty.”
  • Did Texas Prison Guards Drive Marinda Griggs to Kill Herself?

    This is a story focusing on criminal justice, and attempts by defense lawyers to better devise protections for the most vulnerable. And they believe that because of changing law – namely the Texas adoption of its Tort Claims Act – that now the misdeeds of public institutions and their employees will not go unchallenged.