Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "toxic" ...

  • NYT: This Is Our Reality Now

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times.
  • NPR/Frontline: Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • NewsChannel 5 Investigates: Toxic School Water

    This yearlong investigation – more than two dozen stories that culminated in an hourlong, primetime special -- exposed students drinking lead-contaminated water inside Nashville schools, parents being kept in the dark about the test results, as well as officials secretly plotting to bypass lead filters to save money and using testing methods that disguised the real contamination. Through persistence and dogged reporting, we exposed a scandal that would make national news in 2018. As a result, the head of facilities for the school district was forced to resign. District officials were also pressured by Nashville’s mayor and health department to reform their testing practices. In addition, our intense focus on the issue in 2018 would be credited with reviving legislation that’s designed to help keep children across Tennessee safe.
  • CBS THIS MORNING: Methylene Chloride Consumer Alert

    CBS News initiated a multi-part investigation into the sale and use of deadly paint strippers containing the chemical methylene chloride. Over the course of the investigation, CBS News found that the EPA had delayed its report on methylene chloride despite numerous deaths caused by the toxic chemical.
  • Toxic City: Sick Schools

    Children in Philadelphia public schools endure environmental hazards -- deteriorated asbestos, damaged lead paint, festering mold and rodent droppings -- that deprive them of a healthy place to learn and thrive. In reaching our major findings, we conducted 175 scientific tests at 19 elementary schools at a cost of nearly $9,000, built a custom database to analyze more than 250,000 room-by-room environmental records, and interviewed more than 120 teachers, parents, students and experts.
  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • America’s Chernobyl?: Inside the Most Toxic Place in the Nation

    In the course of a six-month investigation, the NBC News Investigative Unit discovered that numerous workers are sick and some have died at a Department of Energy nuclear site, and documented allegations from workers that the US government is covering up the danger. Their report on NBC’s Today Show prompted legislative action and raised larger questions about the ability of the federal government to store some of its most dangerous waste.
  • The Human Toll of Hanford's Dirty Secrets

    "The Human Toll of Hanford’s Dirty Secrets" exposed that in 2016 an unprecedented number of Hanford nuclear workers became ill after breathing toxic chemical vapors emanating from nuclear waste, while the federal government sat back and did little to remedy the crisis. We showed that instead of taking action to protect its workers, officials from the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford’s operator, waged a cover up campaign, denied any problem existed, and even punished workers who insisted on better health protections.
  • Toxic Safety

    A child’s car seat is the only consumer product that is required by law in all 50 states and it is crucial to keep a child safe in the car. However, this investigation revealed false advertising, legal loopholes and outdated federal regulations are exposing millions of children to concerning, even known-cancer-causing chemicals, in their car seats with no apparent safety benefit. Over the course of a year, KPIX lit car seats on fire, commissioned lab tests on car seats and the kids who use them, searched public records, mined social media, analyzed national car fire data and interviewed experts from every applicable industry. The resulting series sparked action by lawmakers, industry groups, consumer advocates, federal regulators and car seat
  • Toxic Armories

    Every time a soldier pulled the trigger inside a National Guard gun range, a bullet cast off bits of lead. An 18-month investigation by The Oregonian/OregonLive found that the Guard's neglect allowed the toxic dust to spread, endangering soldiers and visitors to armories across the United States.