Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "toxic" ...

  • Free to Flee

    In Florida, drunk drivers are routinely not arrested immediately after they cause a fatal crash, even when there’s sufficient probable cause to arrest them. In many cases, the drivers remain free as the investigations drag on for many months, well beyond accepted standards. Our investigation found that dozens of drunk drivers have escaped justice and hundreds more were left on the streets for years before being arrested and convicted, with some committing other crimes while they enjoyed their freedom.
  • Chemical Breakdown

    A 2014 toxic gas release at DuPont’s pesticide plant outside Houston killed four workers and endangered the surrounding community. In response to those deaths, the Houston Chronicle delved deep into the chemical industry, and the way government regulates these potentially harmful facilities. The Chronicle partnered with experts at Texas A&M to establish a methodology for analyzing chemical inventories to create a potential harm index for facilities throughout the Houston area. Our investigation showed facilities with a high potential for harm were all over the metro area, the government has failed at every level to protect the public and the EPA's chosen solution - a network of local emergency planning committees is destined to fail.
  • Dishonorable Conduct

    This prime time documentary showcased a year's worth of investigative reporting from WSMV-TV's investigative unit into the Tennessee National Guard, prompting developments including an assistant district attorney publicly questioning the Governor and the Major General, and a Molotov cocktail thrown at the house of one of our whistleblowers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LD-2vDBdIOE&feature=youtu.be http://www.wsmv.com/story/31370495/court-records-testimony-show-recruiter-accused-of-rape-before-shooting-guardsmen http://www.wsmv.com/story/32296052/retired-first-sgt-says-curse-filled-resignation-letters-stems-from-toxic-leadership
  • Chemical Breakdown

    A 2014 toxic gas release at DuPont’s pesticide plant outside Houston killed four workers and endangered the surrounding community. In response to those deaths, the Houston Chronicle delved deep into the chemical industry, and the way government regulates these potentially harmful facilities. The Chronicle partnered with experts at Texas A&M to establish a methodology for analyzing chemical inventories to create a potential harm index for facilities throughout the Houston area. Our investigation showed facilities with a high potential for harm were all over the metro area, the government has failed at every level to protect the public and the EPA's chosen solution - a network of local emergency planning committees is destined to fail.
  • Dangerous Exposure

    Toxic chemicals seeping from industrial sites across the State of Indiana are contaminating neighborhoods and putting families at risk of dangerous exposure. 13 Investigates discovered most Indiana homeowners are in the dark about toxins lurking below the ground or in the air. The companies responsible for the contamination promised to clean up their messes as part of a voluntary program offered by the State. In exchange, the state provides participating companies legal immunity from getting sued, but 13 Investigates discovered major breakdowns in accountability. Companies hiding out in the program for decades failed to clean up as promised. At the same time Indiana's top environmental watchdog agency failed to enforce the rules to keep homeowners safe. 13 Investigates Reporter Sandra Chapman uncovers what's hidden, presses for answers and finally gets government admissions that the State simply lost track of some sites and poorly managed others. In response the state created new directives to prevent stalled cleanups from exposing neighborhoods to toxic threats. http://youtu.be/cbACoNGvHMU http://www.wthr.com/tags/dangerous-exposures
  • Abandoned Mine Pollution

    CBS 5 Investigates found radioactive uranium from abandoned mines, leaking into Phoenix's largest drinking water reservoir. That is just one of the findings from our investigation into the toxins left behind at as many 100,000 abandoned mines across the state of Arizona. We collected soil and water samples from ten different locations and had them tested for heavy metals and radioactive materials. Our investigation is ongoing, but so far has prompted the US Forest Service to clean up one of the sites at a cost of more than $300,000, and prompted the state of Arizona to begin an inventory of old mines, in order to figure out which ones pose the most dangers to the environment and human health. http://www.cbs5az.com/story/30211875/cbs-5-investigates-abandoned-mines-polluting-valleys-water-supply?autostart=true http://www.cbs5az.com/story/30211875/cbs-5-investigates-abandoned-mines-polluting-valleys-water-supply?autostart=true
  • Sonora River: Massive mine spill continues impact to Sonora River Basin

    One year after the Buenavista del Cobre copper mine spilled 11 million gallons of toxic chemicals into the Sonora River in Mexico, polluting nearly 200 miles of river and threatening the health and livelihood of its residents, the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting highlighted the consequences of an inadequate government response and illegal operations at the mine that led to the spill. Deep reporting illuminates farmers and families still sick from contact with the contaminated water, a government slow to take meaningful action to protect its residents and outdated water quality standards that allow 2.5 times more arsenic than acceptable international norms. https://soundcloud.com/bquester/azcir-sonora-river-radio-preview-with-kpbs
  • Nuclear Risks

    The Obama administration has waged an international campaign to lock down nuclear explosive materials over the past seven years, to stem the risk that a terrorist might detonate a bomb in New York, Washington, or elsewhere. But three countries in particular have proved immune to U.S. pressures for better safeguards: South Africa, Russia, and India. Our deep investigations into their nuclear activities laid bare a toxic mix of ineptitude, nationalism, and greed – and not just in foreign capitals – that keeps the world at risk.
  • The PCB Plague

    We discovered that a majority of public schools in Connecticut could be contaminated with toxic, cancer-causing PCBs, but no state or federal law requires schools to test for the carcinogenic chemical. Even though PCBs were banned in 1979, a loophole in federal regulations allows schools to avoid testing for PCBs, leaving the chemical in place where it emits gaseous toxins, and sending PCB particles into the air and ground during and after construction projects where it can remain for decades.
  • Mercury pollution in small-scale gold mines

    These stories explore the process in which mercury is used in gold mining, the social and medical effects and showcases several tragic cases of young children and adults afflicted with severe mercury poisoning. Tragically, the worldwide effects of mercury poisoning are only now beginning to become apparent after two decades of intense global increases in small-scale gold mining. But it’s becoming clearer that this is becoming a global problem in developing countries as the unchecked use of toxic mercury in rural mining operations increase. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/unearthing-toxic-conditions-impoverished-gold-miners/ http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/extracting-gold-mercury-exacts-lethal-toll/