Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trial" ...

  • Gang Rape, Murder and Justice in a Small Town

    "The re-investigation of a 27-year-old murder. For the first time anywhere, the story revealed the details of how Janet Chandler was killed in a gang rape that was shockingly engineered by a jealous female roommate."
  • Tales of a Mafia Mistress

    The biggest mafia case of 2007 was the Roy Lindley DeVecchio murder trial, where the defendant was a decorated ex-FBI agent. The whole case rested on the mistress of gangster Greg Scarpa Sr., Linda Schiro.
  • Stolen Youth

    Erick Daniels was sent to jail for 10 years "Based on the shape of his eyebrows." After investigating the case, Secret found that there were discrepancies starting with the eyewitness testimony.
  • Firefighter's Explosion

    The Star reinvestigated "the case of five Kansas Citians convicted in 1997 of setting arson fires ten years earlier that sparked an explosion killing six Kansas City firefighters." The Star found that many of the witnesses who testified stood to gain from their claims and that the jurors misunderstood their instructions.
  • Prisoners Dilemma: How NYC's Bail System Puts Justice on Hold

    This story detailed how the imposition of financial bail in relatively minor criminal cases results in the pretrial detention of thousands of mostly poor, largely black or Hispanic New Yorkers every year. It explored every aspect of the process in which bail is set from arrest to arraignment to jail, looking at the role of police, prosecutors, judges, bail bond agents and other players. The piece documented deviations between the reality of bail and its statutory purpose and charted the impact of bail and detention on individual lives and the justice system, as well as dissecting some possible reforms to the system.
  • Plagued By Fear

    Dr. Thomas Butler, a plague researcher who "had treated the Black Death's bloated victims in the Third World," was accused of stealing vials of the plague that disappeared from laboratories where he was doing research in the United States, setting off a federal investigation and a trial. Mangels tells Butler's story in seven parts, detailing lax lab security, the trial and Butler's attempt to rebuild his life.
  • Crime Reporting

    The collection of work includes a broad range of crime reporting angles, including: the impact on victims; the ramifications of crimes that sometimes escape public attention like robberies and stalking; how shoe leather police work can crack an international gambling and money laundering ring and bring a murder suspect who escaped to Mexico to trial in Austin for the first time in recent history.
  • Dangerous Remedy

    Robert Little of The (Baltimore) Sun reported that the U.S. Army has injected over 1000 soldiers wounded in Iraq with a medicine designed for hemophiliacs despite the fact that it is dangerous for people with normal blood. It can give them blood clots that could cause strokes and heart attacks. It costs $6000 per dose. Civilian doctors "have largely rejected it as a standard treatment for trauma patients." Army doctors say, in their experience, the drug saves lives by stopping hemorrhaging. Little says “Doctors in Iraq's emergency rooms, however, almost never care for their patients long enough to see firsthand whether blood clots or other complications have developed." Little reports that "the drug has never been subjected to a large-scale clinical trial to verify that it works and is safe for patients without hemophilia."
  • Terror Informant

    Egyptian immigrant Osama Eldawoody speaks to CBS Evening News about his two years "infiltrating and informing on a small group of Pakistani-Americans who planned to bomb a major New York City subway station at Manhattan's Herald Square." While his efforts helped lead to "one of the few post-9/11 terror trial convictions in New York," he found himself in grave danger. His anonymity was not sustained, and he said there were fatwas - threats - against his life in the NY/NJ Muslim community. Eldawoody felt the government failed him, as his identity was revealed when he testified in court, and he has not received help in finding a new job.
  • Sheriff Lee Baca & L.A. City Jails

    "These stories provide a penetrating look at conditions inside the nation's largest county jail system and show how the violence within cannot be contained. With the jails seriously overcrowded by felony defendants awaiting trial, 150,000 less serious offenders have been released since 2002 after serving fractions of their sentences."