Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trial" ...

  • Drug Problems: Dangerous Decision-Making at the FDA

    The public depends on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ensure that medicines are safe and effective, but through many months and almost 30,000 words of reporting, POGO’s ongoing “Drug Problems” investigation has revealed dangerously lax FDA oversight of prescription drugs. We found that the FDA has set low standards, approved drugs based on flawed clinical trials, taken a toothless approach toward doctors who violate standards of clinical research, allowed misleading marketing, provided inadequate warnings about drug hazards, slighted reports of drug-related deaths and injuries, withheld important information from the public, and made other dubious judgments that advanced the interests of pharmaceutical companies while putting patients at potentially deadly risk. Among other developments detailed in our package: After we exposed a potentially crippling flaw in the testing of a blockbuster drug, the FDA and its European counterpart said they were reexamining the clinical trial upon which they had based the drug’s approval.
  • Blood Lessons

    The Texas Tribune and the Houston Chronicle spent months examining whether the nation’s oil refineries had learned the lessons of the deadly explosion at BP’s Texas City refinery in 2005, one of the most horrific and studied industrial accidents in U.S. history. What our reporters found was astonishing: that preventable deaths in the industry have barely slowed in the decade since the blast in which 15 workers lost their lives.
  • Policed Property

    WSPA discovered a major backlog of civil asset forfeiture cases in a local county. Cars seized more than a decade ago had been rusting in the county impound lot while hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash was in a sheriff’s office bank account without trial. Their digging revealed the cases involved hundreds of defendants including many who had never been charged with a crime. In each case, the cases had never even been scheduled for trial.
  • Dying at Opp

    "Dying at OPP" examined how the troubled Orleans Parish Prison, Louisiana’s largest lockup for pre-trial suspects, handled inmate deaths. The series exposed institutional failings and indifference that persist despite the jail being under a court order mandating widespread reforms. After the series, the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office, which operates the jail, called in outside law enforcement agencies to investigate the latest inmate fatality -- only the second time in at least a decade that an outside law enforcement was called in to review a jail death. The series also led to major policy changes at the Orleans Parish Coroner’s Office. Our series exposed a lack of autopsies when inmates died at a hospital after becoming ill or injured in jail. The coroner now requires his pathologists conduct autopsies in those cases.
  • Hartman Justice Project

    Recent developments in Alaska Innocence Project’s battle for exoneration of the so-called Fairbanks Four, a largely Athabaskan group of men serving sentences ranging from 33-75 years for John Hartman’s 1997 murder. O'Donoghue has been dogging, with the help of undergraduate students, what now appears to wrongful convictions in this case for more years than I care to count, exposing many flaws in a police investigation drawing direction from drunken confessions, trials sporting lying witnesses and racist prosecutorial branding, jury misconduct that (briefly) overturned one verdict in 2004.
  • The Clerk’s Files

    When Watchdog City began these stories as an outgrowth of beat reporting on county government, they had no idea it would lead to filing a lawsuit that successfully challenged high public records fees and produced a favorable ruling after a hard-fought trial in June 2014. With unlimited taxpayer funds at his disposal to spend on legal fees, the county’s elected auditor and accountant — the Clerk of Courts — has since appealed the circuit judge’s ruling in my favor. The case is now on its way to Florida’s Second District Court of Appeal.
  • Undue Force

    For six months reporter Mark Puente investigated how widespread police brutality was in Baltimore. He used court records and trial transcripts, but the heart of the reporting came from coaxing subjects to tell their stories. In addition, to the human toll, the investigation revealed that the city was paying millions in lawsuits involving police brutality and misconduct, shocking officials who said they were unaware of the scope of the problem. Puente's work resulted in a U.S. Justice Department review of the police department, local reforms and proposals for state legislation.
  • The Trials of Jamaican Gays Can the national culture move toward tolerance?

    Jamaica is famous for its Caribbean beaches, relaxed attitudes. Behind that veneer is a hostile home for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and transgender people. After one recent grizzly death, where a mob that killed 16-year-old Dwayne Jones, the nation’s top law enforcement officer proclaimed that Jamaica did not have a problem with intolerance. Documents, data and interviews told a much different story. Plus a strong US connection: how our country is feeling the effects of Jamaica’s anti-gay climate, as gay refugees seek political asylum in the United States, and many are getting that protection.
  • Culture of Fear

    A University of Minnesota hospital insider comes forward with secret recordings which reveal a "culture of fear" and a "research at all costs" attitude in which the well being of extremely vulnerable psychiatric patients takes a back seat to having them participate in drug trials. The series includes a profile of one patient who's own medical records provide compelling evidence he was coerced into taking an experimental drug that nearly drove him to commit suicide. Another report probes the haunting case of a UM psychiatrist who diagnosed a teenager with a mental illness and determined he needed medication to reduce the threat of violent behaviors. But the doctor did not disclose his findings to the boy's family. Weeks later the boy, who was still un-medicated, went on a killing spree.
  • Deadly Mills

    The aftermath of two sawmill explosions in British Columbia, what caused them, and why regulatory charges were never laid, even though survivors, an industrial hygienist and the labor union insisted that the companies did not pay proper attention to warnings, and ignored the history of sawdust fires and explosions in North America. The explosions were preventable, but the companies did little or nothing to secure the mills while they were creating large amounts of particularly combustible sawdust.