Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trial" ...

  • Some city workers take years, not days, to heal

    Eagle Tribune (Lawrence, Mass.) investigates the large number of worker compensation claims against the city of Lawrence, and finds a workers compensation system out of control and a city attorney who has not won a case before the state Industrial Accident Board in two years despite widespread malingering by workers; pay and benefits cost taxpayers upwards of $2 million.
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    National Law Journal investigates efforts by criminal defense attorneys in the southern states to provide a fair legal defense to indigent defendants in capital murder cases; several southern states have passed "fee caps" on how much a court-appointed defense attorney can receive for handling a death penalty trial, Nov. 19, 1990.
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    ABA Journal gives an overview of the trial of the man accused by the U.S. Justice Department as the "No. 4 man in the Medellin cartel," December 1990.
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    Times Leader (Wilkes-Barre, Pa.) reveals how a state and federally funded industrial park has been a failure; the director of the project has gained total control and is using it for his own personal gain, August, September and October 1990.
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    National Law Journal (New York, N.Y.) investigates the case of Leonard Peltier, a leader of the American Indian Movement, and determines that overwhelming evidence exists to prove that he did not receive a fair trial when he was convicted of the murder of two FBI agents, including the fabrication of evidence and inconsistent evidence; documents the groundswell of support for Peltier that has arisen nationally and internationally, June 25, 1990.
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    Journal-Gazette (Fort Wayne, Ind.) discovers that the city of Fort Wayne has been doing a poor job in monitoring the level of chemicals being discharged by local companies into the sewer system; finds that fines to industrial violators have been non-existent, and that the city itself has been discharging illegal levels of chemicals into the sewer system, Nov. 27, 1990.
  • And Justice for Some

    WTKR-TV (Norfolk, Va.) focuses on an obscure state law that allows legislators who are lawyers to delay trials whenever they are conducting state business; one powerful legislator and popular attorney enable alleged violent criminals to go free on bond with postponements, July 16 - 18, 1990.
  • Hazzardous Chemicals in the Workplace

    WWMT-TV (Kalamazoo, Mich.) examines industrial chemical regulation; finds chemicals that pose health risks for workers, nearby residents and firefighters are not made public; one in five companies investigated did not file a material safety data sheet; local government can't afford to monitor companies, Jan. 23 - 31, 1990.
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    Milwaukee Journal reports on an overwhelmed criminal justice system; taxpayers pay for people to stay in county jail in violation of bail principles and at greater expense than the crimes awaiting trial; every link in the system, including judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys and county and state legislators, contribute to an overburdened system, July 22 - 24, 1990.
  • Justice Under Siege

    Evansville (Ind.) Courier loaded data from 545 felony cases into a computer and found that only 9 percent of cases were going to trial--the rest were being plea-bargained; race and economic status had an impact on time served, and too many public defenders had caseloads that left them virtually ineffective for their poor clients.